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39 Common Birds Of Chhattisgarh

Chhattisgarh, a state located in central India, is a veritable paradise for bird lovers. The diverse terrain of the state, including dense forests, mountains, plateaus, and rivers, provides a perfect habitat for a myriad of bird species.

The avifauna of Chhattisgarh is abundant and includes both resident and migratory birds. With over 400 species of birds, the state offers a haven for bird enthusiasts and ornithologists.

The birds in Chhattisgarh are not only diverse but also unique, boasting of rare and endemic species such as the Bastar Hill Myna, Forest Owlet, and Indian Pitta.

This article will provide insights into some of the most amazing birds in Chhattisgarh, highlighting their distinctive physical features, habitats, and distribution in the state.

1. Cotton Pygmy Goose

Cotton pygmy goose

The Cotton Pygmy Goose is a small perching duck found throughout Asia and Southeast Asia, extending south to Queensland.

It stands out among waterfowl as one of the smallest in the world, with a quill-white coloration that helps it blend into its environment.

They often live alone or in pairs but form larger groups when looking for food near bodies of water with plenty of aquatic vegetation.

These birds are omnivorous, feeding on plants like grasses and seeds alongside insects such as beetles and termites.

Their diet also includes fish eggs and larvae from time to time. The cotton pygmies’ size makes them an easy target for predators so they use their agility to quickly escape danger whenever possible.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderAnseriformes
FamilyAnatidae
GenusNettapus
SpeciesN. coromandelianus

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2. Lesser Whistling Duck

Lesser whistling duck

The Lesser Whistling Duck is a species of whistling duck found in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia.

It has an unmistakable appearance, with its brown body, white-streaked wings and distinctive black tail feathers.

The adult ducks have red bills, eyes and legs with yellowish webbed feet for swimming.

They are generally nocturnal feeders but during the day they can be seen around lakes or wet paddy fields in flocks perching on trees or even building their nest inside tree hollows.

Their diet mainly consists of seeds from aquatic plants as well as small fish, mollusks and insects occasionally taken while wading or diving into water bodies to find food sources.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderAnseriformes
FamilyAnatidae
GenusDendrocygna
SpeciesD. javanica

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3. Indian Roller

Indian roller

The Indian roller is a beautiful bird of the Coraciidae family. It has an average length of 12-13 inches and weighs 5.9 to 6.2 ounces with a wingspan of 26-29 inches.

Its face and throat are pinkish, while its head and back are brown with blue on its rump, light blue markings on one side of the wing, dark blue markings on other side making it easily distinguishable in flight.

Both male and female have same colouration but males tend to be slightly larger than females though they can only be differentiated when seen together closely due to similar colouring pattern between sexes.

The Indian Roller makes spectacular aerial dives from great heights during courtship display which attracts many viewers each year.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCoraciiformes
FamilyCoraciidae
GenusCoracias
SpeciesC. benghalensis

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4. Greater Coucal

Greater coucal

The Greater Coucal is a large, crow-like bird that belongs to the Cuculiformes order. It has a long tail and coppery brown wings.

These birds are found in many habitats across India and Southeast Asia, ranging from jungles to suburban gardens.

They feed on insects as well as small vertebrates such as frogs, lizards or snakes which they capture with their strong beak.

The males have glossy black plumage while females are dark brown above with buff underparts.

During breeding season these birds make loud croaking calls and can often be heard at night when they become active after sundown looking for food sources like termites or grasshoppers between bushes or low branches of trees close by water bodies like rivers, lakes etc.

This species plays an important role in maintaining ecological balance in its habitat by controlling pest populations through predation so it is essential that we protect them from hunting and other threats for future generations to enjoy.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCuculiformes
FamilyCuculidae
GenusCentropus
SpeciesC. sinensis

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5. Red-Wattled Lapwing

Red-wattled lapwing

The Red-wattled Lapwing is an Asian bird belonging to the family Charadriidae. It has a distinctive loud call which led to it being nicknamed ‘did he do it’ by locals, due to its sound resembling the phrase.

These birds are usually found on open ground and cannot perch like other lapwings. They have black feathers with white wings, back and tail along with reddish wattles near their eyes that give them their name.

Red-wattled Lapwings feed mainly on insects but also eat some plant matter such as seeds or grains.

During breeding season they form strong pair bonds and make nests in shallow depressions of sand or soil lined with vegetation for incubating eggs during mating season before hatching out young chicks in around 25 days after laying eggs.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCharadriiformes
FamilyCharadriidae
GenusVanellus
SpeciesV. indicus

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6. Indian Cuckoo

Indian cuckoo

The Indian cuckoo is a beautiful bird belonging to the Cuculiformes family and found in the subcontinent of India and Southeast Asia.

It has an impressive range, stretching from India, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Sri Lanka all the way east to Indonesia, north to China and even Russia.

They usually live alone or in pairs at high altitudes up to 3,600m (11800ft), typically inhabiting woodlands or open forests.

This medium-sized cuckoo is quite shy but easily identified by its distinct white throat patch edged with black as well as its white belly with grey flanks.

Its call can also be heard throughout many parts of South Asia during mating season between April – June; it’s distinctive “coo-kook” sound bringing joyousness into any jungle atmosphere.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCuculiformes
FamilyCuculidae
GenusCuculus
SpeciesC. micropterus

7. Yellow-Wattled Lapwing

Yellow-wattled lapwing

The Yellow-wattled Lapwing is a stunning bird native to the Indian Subcontinent. It has an unmistakable appearance, with its grey brown body and black cap contrasting sharply against its bright yellow legs and triangular wattle at the base of its neck.

Not only does this make it easily identifiable, but also makes it quite attractive in appearance.

The bird is capable of fast flight and has a sharp call which can be heard over long distances on dry plains across peninsular India.

Although they don’t migrate, they do make seasonal movements depending on rainfall patterns in their locale making them adaptive birds too.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCharadriiformes
FamilyCharadriidae
GenusVanellus
SpeciesV. malabaricus

8. Asian Openbill

Asian openbill

The Asian openbill is a large stork found in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. It has a greyish or white body, glossy black wings and tail, with an adult having a gap between upper mandible and lower one.

Juveniles don’t have this unique feature but will grow it as they mature.

They feed by wading through shallow water looking for snails, crustaceans and aquatic plants to eat from the surface of mudflats or marshes.

Due to its enormous size (up to 121 cm tall) it makes quite an impressive sight when flying.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCiconiiformes
FamilyCiconiidae
GenusAnastomus
SpeciesA. oscitans

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9. Indian Courser

Indian courser

The Indian courser is a species of bird found in South Asia, mostly around the Ganges and Indus river systems. It belongs to the family of ground birds known as “coursers”.

Small groups can be seen foraging on insects amongst dry and open semi-desert areas.

The first scientific description was by Johann Friedrich Gmeli in 1789, with them being quite small but striking creatures due to their white stripes running down its back and black neck rings.

They prefer warm climates with little rainfall or snowfall; however they are still very adaptable when it comes to food sources such as grasshoppers, beetles or spiders which make up most of their diet.

Although not endangered yet, there’s concern that humans may encroach upon its natural habitat leading to population decline if left uncheckedScientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCharadriiformes
FamilyGlareolidae
GenusCursorius
SpeciesC. coromandelicus

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10. Indian Pond Heron

Indian pond heron

The Indian Pond Heron, also called Paddybird is a small heron found in the Old World. It breeds from southern Iran to India, Burma and Sri Lanka and can be seen near waterbodies or even around human habitations.

These birds are easily recognisable when they take off as their wings make a loud whistling sound due to its long flight feathers which are greyish-brown with white patches on them.

They feed mainly on fish but will eat other aquatic creatures such as frogs and insects too.

During breeding season they construct nests made of reeds close to water bodies where they lay 3–5 eggs at once.

The female incubates the eggs for about 19 days after which both parents share duties of feeding chicks until juveniles become independent enough to fly away.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPelecaniformes
FamilyArdeidae
GenusArdeola
SpeciesA. grayii

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11. Indian Golden Oriole

Indian golden oriole

The Indian golden oriole is a species of oriole found in the Indian subcontinent and Central Asia.

It has been identified as a full distinct species from Eurasian golden Oriole by its black eye stripe which extends behind the eyes.

With its bright yellow body, black wings and tail with white patches, this bird stands out among other birds in its region.

The males are more brightly colored than females but both share similar features such as long pointed bills and strong legs for perching or hopping through trees.

They feed mainly on insects, fruits and nectar while their diet may also include small reptiles like lizards depending on availability of food sources around them.

This beautiful songbird can often be spotted during spring when they migrate to find suitable breeding grounds where they build nests high up in tree branches to lay eggs.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyOriolidae
GenusOriolus
SpeciesO. kundoo

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12. White-Eyed Buzzard

White-eyed buzzard

The White-eyed Buzzard is a medium-sized hawk found in South Asia. It has a brown head, rufous tail and distinctive white iris.

Its throat bears a dark mesial stripe bordered by white feathers, while its upper wing holds pale median coverts.

Unlike true buzzards, the underside of their wings don’t have carpal patches.

They feed on small mammals such as rodents and lizards; they also consume snakes and large insects like locusts or grasshoppers.

These birds build stick nests high up in trees for breeding purposes; usually laying one to two eggs at once which are incubated over 4 weeks .

The chicks fledge after about 6 weeks but will stay with their parents until the next breeding season begins when they become independent adults that can live up to 10 years old.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderAccipitriformes
FamilyAccipitridae
GenusButastur
SpeciesB. teesa

13. Cinnamon Bittern

Cinnamon bittern

The Cinnamon Bittern is a small Old World bird, found in parts of India, China and Indonesia. It can be identified by its chestnut brown colour on the back and wings with white streaks throughout.

During breeding season it has yellowish-brown plumage on its head neck and breast. Its legs are black which helps distinguish it from other bitterns.

The cinnamon bittern mainly resides in tropical or subtropical climates but some northern birds migrate short distances during winter months for food sources.

They feed mostly on fish, insects, frogs and crustaceans while they breed between April to August making nests near shallow water areas under dense vegetation cover providing safety from predators like snakes or cats that may prey upon them otherwise.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPelecaniformes
FamilyArdeidae
GenusIxobrychus
SpeciesI. cinnamomeus

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14. Coppersmith Barbet

Coppersmith barbet

The Coppersmith barbet is an attractive Asian bird, easily recognizable by its bright crimson forehead and throat.

It has a call that sounds like a coppersmith striking metal with a hammer – hence its name.

These birds are found in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia where they build their nests inside trees, carving out holes for themselves.

They can often be seen perched high up on trees or wires during the day as they feed on fruit from nearby branches.

The vibrant colors of these birds make them stand out amongst other species in their habitat.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyMegalaimidae
GenusPsilopogon
SpeciesP. haemacephalus

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15. Brown Fish Owl

Brown fish owl

The Brown Fish Owl is a species of owl found in Turkey, South and Southeast Asia. It inhabits forests and wooded wetlands with its wide distribution leading to it being categorized as least concern on the IUCN Red List.

Of all four living fish owl species, this one is the most abundant, widespread and studied. Its diet consists mainly of fish but also small mammals or reptiles when available.

They usually hunt from perches near water sources waiting for their prey before swooping down to capture them using powerful talons between dusk until dawn.

These birds are monogamous with pairs staying together throughout the year while raising their young which hatch after 30 days of incubation by both parents in tree hollows or rock crevices close to streams or lakesides where they can easily find food for themselves and their offspringScientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderStrigiformes
FamilyStrigidae
GenusKetupa
SpeciesK. zeylonensis

16. Crested Honey Buzzard

Crested honey buzzard

The Crested Honey Buzzard is a medium-sized raptor found in the family Accipitridae. They measure between 57 and 60 cm, making them one of the smaller birds of prey.

It is also referred to as Oriental, Asiatic or Eastern Honey Buzzard due to its wide range across Asia.

These buzzards have six subspecies with distinct features such as white tail tip feathers on some species while others have brownish black wings and bodies that are either grey or chestnut coloured.

Their diet consists mainly of honeybees, wasps and other insects which they hunt using their sharp vision along with swift flight speed reaching up to 70 km/h during migrations.

The Crested Honey Buzzard plays an important role within their ecosystem by controlling populations of insect pests which can be harmful for our environment if left unchecked.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderAccipitriformes
FamilyAccipitridae
GenusPernis
SpeciesP. ptilorhynchus

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17. Chestnut-Bellied Sandgrouse

Chestnut-bellied sandgrouse

The Chestnut-bellied sandgrouse is a species of bird found in northern and central Africa, as well as western and southern Asia.

It has six recognised subspecies which differ in plumage colouration; males typically have mostly light buffy brown feathers with darker bars on the wings, while females are greyer with paler head markings.

These birds prefer semi-arid regions such as deserts or grasslands where they eat seeds from plants like grasses, herbs and shrubs.

They can be nomadic depending on food availability but tend to be sedentary during mating season when they form small groups called leks for courtship displays involving intricate feather ruffling and strutting around potential mates.

The Chestnut-bellied Sandgrouse is an important part of its native ecosystems due to their role in dispersing plant seeds over large areas through defecating them after ingestion.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPterocliformes
FamilyPteroclidae
GenusPterocles
SpeciesP. exustus

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18. Black Bittern

Black bittern

The Black Bittern is a large species of bird found in tropical Asia, stretching from Pakistan to China and Indonesia. It measures 58 cm (23 inches) long which makes it the largest bittern within its genus Ixobrychus.

The bird has black feathers on its back with white stripes running down either side, dark brown upper parts and yellow-brown underparts.

Its bill is short and thick while legs are greenish-yellow in color. They mainly reside where they breed but some northern birds migrate for shorter distances during winter seasons.

These birds feed upon fish, frogs, insects as well as small reptiles among other things making them omnivorous predators of their environment.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPelecaniformes
FamilyArdeidae
GenusIxobrychus
SpeciesI. flavicollis

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19. Mottled Wood Owl

Mottled wood owl

The Mottled Wood Owl is a large owl species native to India. It has distinctive mottling on its feathers, earning it the name “mottled”.

These owls have eerie calls that can be heard at dawn and dusk, including duets between males and females, low hoots and screeches.

They inhabit gardens as well as thin deciduous forests near dry thorn forests or farmland. Due to their large size they may seem intimidating when spotted in the wild but are actually quite timid birds who prefer not to confront humans unless necessary.

The Mottled Wood Owls mainly feed on rodents such as rats and mice which they locate through their excellent hearing abilities before swooping down for capture.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderStrigiformes
FamilyStrigidae
GenusStrix
SpeciesS. ocellata

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20. Yellow-Crowned Woodpecker

Yellow-crowned woodpecker

The Yellow-crowned woodpecker is a small, pied bird found in the Indian subcontinent. It was first described by English ornithologist John Latham in 1801 and is the only species within its genus Leiopicus.

This species has black upperparts with white stripes on its wings and yellow crowns along their heads and necks.

Its underparts are usually greyish or brownish with buffy streaks which help it to camouflage among tree branches as they feed mainly on insects like ants, beetles, bees etc that live inside trunks of trees.

They also eat fruits occasionally but mostly rely on insects for sustenance during breeding season when food availability increases significantly compared to other times of year due to insect activity increasing around this time period.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusLeiopicus Bonaparte, 1854
SpeciesL. mahrattensis

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21. Shikra

Shikra

The Shikra bird, also known as the little banded goshawk, is a widespread bird of prey found in Asia and Africa. It is a small species belonging to the Accipitridae family.

The African variations of the Shikra may potentially represent a distinct species, but they are usually considered subspecies.

This bird has physical similarities to other sparrowhawk species, such as the Chinese Goshawk and Eurasian Sparrowhawk.

The Shikra is a quick predator and possesses excellent hunting skills. It typically preys on small mammals, reptiles, and birds.

The bird is known for its distinctive hunting technique, which involves a sudden dash and a quick silent strike to capture its victim.

Its plumage consists of brown or greyish-brown feathers with white and fine black streaks.

Overall, the Shikra bird is an impressive bird of prey, known for its versatility and hunting prowess.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderAccipitriformes
FamilyAccipitridae
GenusAccipiter
SpeciesA. badius

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22. Brown-Headed Barbet

Brown-headed barbet

The Brown-headed barbet is an Asian bird that lives in the moist broadleaf forests of the Indian subcontinent. Johann Friedrich Gmelin described it in 1788 as part of the puffbird family.

The Brown-headed barbet has a distinct brown head and a green body. They are known for their distinctive calls, which can be heard echoing through the forests.

These birds feed on insects and fruits, using their strong beaks to break open nuts and seeds.

They are cavity nesters, making their homes in holes in trees. The Brown-headed barbet is considered a species of least concern, although its habitats are threatened by deforestation and human activities.

Their colorful appearance and unique calls make them a delight for birdwatchers to spot in the wild.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyMegalaimidae
GenusPsilopogon
SpeciesP. zeylanicus

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23. Spotted Owlet

Spotted owlet

The Spotted owlet, also known as Athene brama, is a small bird species found in tropical Asia, from mainland India to Southeast Asia. It is a common resident of open habitats, including farmland and human habitation.

This bird has adapted well to living in urban areas and can be found roosting in small groups in cavities of trees, rocks or buildings.

They typically nest in holes in trees or buildings and lay 3-5 eggs. The Spotted owlet has shown great adaptability to changing environments and has learned to coexist with humans in urban settings.

This bird is known for its distinctive spotted appearance and has become a well-loved sight in many parts of Asia.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderStrigiformes
FamilyStrigidae
GenusAthene
SpeciesA. brama

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24. Jungle Owlet

Jungle owlet

The jungle owlet is a small bird that is native to the Indian Subcontinent. It is also known as the barred jungle owlet and is often found alone or in small groups.

Their calls are heard at dawn and dusk. There are two subspecies of the jungle owlet, with the one found in the Western Ghats potentially being a separate species. They have a rounded head and are finely barred all over.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderStrigiformes
FamilyStrigidae
GenusGlaucidium
SpeciesG. radiatum

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25. Chestnut-Headed Bee-Eater

Chestnut-headed bee-eater

The Chestnut-headed bee-eater is a vibrantly colourful bird found in the Indian subcontinent and neighbouring regions. It belongs to the bee-eater family and is a resident breeder.

The bird is slender and has a predominantly green body, along with blue on the rump and lower belly. The bird’s chestnut head is its most distinguishing feature, which gives it its name.

The bird’s beak is long, pointed and slightly curved, ideal for catching insects, its primary food. These birds prefer living in open and wooded habitats like gardens and deciduous forests.

They are known for their swift flight and have the ability to catch insects while airborne. These birds have a unique nesting behaviour, where they use their beaks to excavate holes in vertical sandbanks or similar substrates.

Despite their beauty and unique characteristics, these birds are vulnerable to habitat loss and deforestation, making conservation efforts more critical than ever.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCoraciiformes
FamilyMeropidae
GenusMerops
SpeciesM. leschenaulti

26. Crested Treeswift

Crested treeswift

The crested treeswift bird is a species of tree swift and is distinct in flight with its long, bowed wings and deeply forked tail.

It is often confused with its eastern relative, the gray-rumped treeswift, but they do not interbreed where their ranges overlap.

This bird has a pointed appearance and can be recognized by its crested head. The crested treeswift is a large bird that is known for its ability to fly long distances with ease.

It is often found in forested areas and feeds on insects which it catches while in flight.

This bird is a beautiful addition to any natural environment and is a joy to observe in flight.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
CladeStrisores
OrderApodiformes
FamilyHemiprocnidae
GenusHemiprocne
SpeciesH. coronata

27. Red-Naped Ibis

Red-naped ibis

The Red-naped ibis, also known as the Indian black ibis or black ibis, is a species of bird found in the plains of the Indian Subcontinent.

This ibis is unique as it does not heavily rely on water and is often seen in dry fields far away from water bodies.

It is typically found in loose groups and is easily identifiable by its dark body with a white patch on the neck.

The Red-naped ibis, unlike other ibises in the region, can adapt to different environments and feed on a variety of prey. They are known to feed on insects, small reptiles, and even small birds.

This bird species plays an important role in controlling insect populations and is integral to its ecosystem.

Population numbers for the Red-naped ibis remain stable, making it a common sight for bird enthusiasts in the Indian Subcontinent.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPelecaniformes
FamilyThreskiornithidae
GenusPseudibis
SpeciesP. papillosa

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28. Plain Prinia

Plain prinia

The Plain prinia, also known as the plain wren-warbler or white-browed wren-warbler, is a small bird species found in southeast Asia.

They are resident breeders in regions ranging from Pakistan and India to south China and southeast Asia.

This bird was once considered a part of the tawny-flanked prinia species, which resides in Africa south of the Sahara.

Additionally, the Plain prinia is a cisticolid warbler. This species is relatively small in size and known for its plain appearance.

Despite being widespread, the Plain prinia is not commonly seen since they prefer to stay hidden in dense vegetation, particularly grasslands and shrublands.

The male birds are known for their high-pitched and melodious songs, which they use to attract mates and defend their territory.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCisticolidae
GenusPrinia
SpeciesP. inornata

29. Ashy-Crowned Sparrow-Lark

Ashy-crowned sparrow-lark

The Ashy-crowned sparrow-lark is a small bird that belongs to the lark family. It is commonly found in open lands across South Asia where there is bare ground, grass, and scrub.

During the breeding season, males are easily recognizable by their distinct black-and-white face pattern, while females have a sandy brown color that resembles a female sparrow.

Despite their small size, these birds are very active and can be seen flying and hopping around frequently.

They are known for their beautiful singing voice, which is often heard during the mating season.

The Ashy-crowned sparrow-lark is an important part of the natural ecosystem and plays a crucial role in maintaining the balance of the food chain.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyAlaudidae
GenusEremopterix
SpeciesE. griseus

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30. Small Minivet

Small minivet

The small minivet bird is a passerine species found in tropical southern Asia. It measures around 16cm in length with a robust dark beak and long wings.

Male small minivets differ from other common minivet species by having grey upperparts and head, and orange underparts that fade to yellow on the belly. This bird can be commonly found from the Indian subcontinent to Indonesia.

Even though the small minivet is a small bird, it is quite remarkable with its distinct features and colorful plumage. Its strong beak helps build intricate nests used to raise their young ones.

Despite its small size, the small minivet plays an essential role in maintaining the ecological balance of their habitat.

Overall, the small minivet is a fascinating species and an excellent example of the diverse and beautiful avian life found in Asia.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCampephagidae
GenusPericrocotus
SpeciesP. cinnamomeus

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31. White-Browed Fantail

White-browed fantail

The White-browed fantail bird is a member of the Rhipiduridae family and is quite small, measuring only 18 cm in length. Its upperparts are dark brown, and it has white spots on its wings.

The underparts are whitish, and the tail is fan-shaped and has white edges. On its forehead, the long white supercilia meet, and the throat and eyemask are blackish and bordered with a whitish moustache.

This bird’s appearance is unique, and it is a delight to see in nature.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyRhipiduridae
GenusRhipidura
SpeciesR. aureola

32. Indian Nightjar

Indian nightjar

The Indian nightjar is a tiny bird that inhabits open areas in South and Southeast Asia. It is known for its nocturnal habits and distinct calls, which resemble the sound of a stone skipping on ice.

This bird is crepuscular, meaning that it is most active during dawn and dusk. Although it is not often seen, it can be identified by its unique clicking calls.

The Indian nightjar is a resident breeder, which means it stays in one area year-round and breeds there.

This bird chooses its habitat carefully, preferring open landscapes where it can easily find insects to feed on during the night.

Overall, the Indian nightjar is a fascinating and elusive bird that adds to the diversity of birdlife in Asia.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
CladeStrisores
OrderCaprimulgiformes
FamilyCaprimulgidae
GenusCaprimulgus
SpeciesC. asiaticus

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33. Black-Headed Cuckooshrike

Black-headed cuckooshrike

The Black-headed cuckooshrike is a bird species found in the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia.

Males and females have different appearances, with the male having a black head and white underparts and the female being brownish-gray with a white belly.

They inhabit trees in forests and gardens, and feed on insects and berries. These birds are known for their beautiful songs and can often be heard singing loudly in the morning.

They are also known to be aggressive towards other bird species, and will defend their territory fiercely.

Their conservation status is listed as Least Concern, although habitat loss and fragmentation may pose a threat to their population in the future.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCampephagidae
GenusLalage
SpeciesL. melanoptera

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34. Brown Crake

Brown crake

The Brown crake, also known as the Brown bush-hen, is a type of waterbird from the Rallidae family found in southern Asia.

The exact origin of the name “akool” is uncertain, although it may have ties to Hindu mythology or the Sinhalese language.

This species is known to reside in wetland areas and feeds on insects, small fish, and aquatic plants. The Brown crake is a small, elusive bird with brown plumage and a distinctive red bill.

Despite being a relatively common species, they are not often seen due to their shy nature and habitat preferences.

Overall, the Brown crake is an interesting and important member of the aquatic bird community in South Asia.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGruiformes
FamilyRallidae
GenusZapornia
SpeciesZ. akool

35. Ruddy-Breasted Crake

Ruddy-breasted crake

The ruddy-breasted crake, also known as the ruddy crake, belongs to the rail and crake family Rallidae. This waterbird can be found in swamps and wet areas across South Asia, including the Indian subcontinent, south China, Japan, and Indonesia.

Although it is typically a permanent resident throughout its range, it has been recorded as a vagrant in Australia’s Christmas Island.

The breeding habitat of these birds is characterized by swampy areas with sufficient water supply. As the name suggests, the ruddy-breasted crake features a reddish-brown breast and is relatively small in size.

Despite being well distributed, not much is known about these elusive birds. Even with its small size, the ruddy-breasted crake is known for its distinctive call, which can be heard echoing across the waterways where it lives.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGruiformes
FamilyRallidae
GenusZapornia
SpeciesZ. fusca

36. Rain Quail

Rain quail

The rain quail, also known as the black-breasted quail, is a species of bird found in South-east Asia and the Indian Sub-continent. Its habitat includes countries such as Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, and Bangladesh.

The bird was first described by German naturalist Johann Friedrich Gmelin in 1789. With black stripes on its head, the rain quail is small and has a distinct appearance.

Interestingly, the bird is known by the name “rain quail” because it is believed to prefer breeding and nesting during the rainy season.

This bird species has importance in game hunting and is considered a delicacy in some parts of the world.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGalliformes
FamilyPhasianidae
GenusCoturnix
SpeciesC. coromandelica

37. Savanna Nightjar

Savanna nightjar

The savanna nightjar, also known as the allied nightjar or Franklin’s nightjar, is a species of bird found in South and Southeast Asia. This nocturnal bird inhabits open forests and scrub areas.

It is known to have eight subspecies, including monticolus, amoyensis, and stictomus. The savanna nightjar is of medium length and has distinct features such as a broad bill and a well-camouflaged plumage.

It is also known for its unique vocalization during the night. This bird’s survival depends on the conservation of its natural habitat, and efforts for this are underway.

Hence, the savanna nightjar is a fascinating and significant species in the avian world.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
CladeStrisores
OrderCaprimulgiformes
FamilyCaprimulgidae
GenusCaprimulgus
SpeciesC. affinis

38. Oriental Scops Owl

Oriental scops owl

The Oriental scops owl is a small and colorful bird species that can be found in eastern and southern parts of Asia. It has yellow eyes and ear-tufts that are not always upright.

This species can be differentiated from the collared scops owl by its whitish scapular stripe, well-defined underparts, and absence of a pale collar.

The Oriental scops owl has two color variations, which are grey and rufous, with intermediate forms also existing.

Despite being small in size, this owl species is often spotted in its natural habitat and is admired for its beauty.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderStrigiformes
FamilyStrigidae
GenusOtus
SpeciesO. sunia

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39. White-Naped Woodpecker

White-naped woodpecker

The white-naped woodpecker is a bird species found in the Indian Subcontinent. It breeds in open forest and scrub habitats with trees. It lays one or two white eggs in tree holes.

It is a scarce breeder and widely distributed in its range. The bird was described by Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon in 1780.Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusChrysocolaptes
SpeciesC. festivus

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