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10 Birds That Live In The Grand Canyon National Park

Grand Canyon National Park is known for its breathtaking views and stunning scenery, but it is also home to a diverse range of bird species. The park's unique environment, which consists of rugged cliffs, towering plateaus, and rushing rivers, provides a habitat for many birds that cannot be found anywhere else.

Visitors to the park can enjoy the sight of eagles soaring gracefully overhead, colorful songbirds flitting through the trees, and majestic condors taking flight from the canyon rims.

With over 370 different bird species recorded in the park, Grand Canyon National Park is a veritable paradise for bird enthusiasts and nature lovers alike.

1. Acorn woodpecker

Acorn woodpecker

The Acorn woodpecker is a medium-sized bird with an average weight of 85 grams and 8.3 inches in length. It was first described by the English naturalist William John Swainson from a specimen collected in Mexico, back in 1827.

Its scientific name, Melanerpes formicivorus, combines Latin words meaning "ant" and "-vorous".

This species has distinct black plumage all over its body except for some white patches on their wings and tail feathers which can be seen when flying or perched atop trees.

They are known to store acorns inside tree crevices as well as within bark cracks - often using them during lean times.

The acorn woodpecker is also socially active; they live together with other birds of their kind in groups called 'granaries'. Their chirps are loud enough that they can easily be heard from afar.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusMelanerpes
SpeciesM. formicivorus

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2. Groove-billed ani

Groove-billed ani

The Groove-billed ani is a tropical bird belonging to the cuckoo family. It has a long tail and large, curved beak.

This species can be found in many parts of Central America, from southern Texas to northern Colombia and Venezuela, as well as coastal Ecuador and Peru.

In some places it may retreat during colder months but overall they are considered resident birds throughout their range.

They prefer open woodlands near water sources like mangroves or swamps where there plenty of insects for them to feed on such as grasshoppers and beetles.

The beautiful coloration of this species ranges from blackish brown with orange spots on its wings that give way to bright blue feathers at the end of its tail making it quite striking.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCuculiformes
FamilyCuculidae
GenusCrotophaga
SpeciesC. sulcirostris

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3. Western bluebird

Western bluebird

The Western Bluebird is a small North American thrush that was formally described by English naturalist William John Swainson in 1832.

It has six subspecies and measures 15 to 18 cm long, with the adult male being bright blue on top and light orange-brown underneath.

Its wings have white bars which contrast against its bright plumage. The female is duller overall but retains the same wing pattern as its counterpart.

In addition, it also sports an attractive reddish patch near its bill area when breeding season arrives.

This species can be found inhabiting open woodlands, grassy meadows or agricultural areas of western America from Alaska southwards into Mexico and Guatemala where they feed mainly on insects such as beetles, flies, ants etc..

All in all this gorgeous bird adds colour to any environment.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
GenusSialia
SpeciesS. mexicana

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4. Lewis's woodpecker

Lewis s woodpecker

Lewis's woodpecker is a large species of North American bird, discovered and named after Meriwether Lewis by the ornithologist Alexander Wilson.

Its body measures 18-23 cm in length, with a wingspan ranging from 25 to 30 cm.

It has dark plumage on its back and head that transitions into lighter brown feathers on its chest, belly and tail.

The male bird has bright red patches along the sides of his neck as well as at the base of his bill while females have pinkish or yellow tones instead.

This species primarily feeds on insects such ants which it finds underneath bark or near dead trees where they live their solitary lives except during mating season when pairs form temporary bonds for breeding purposes before going off alone again afterwards.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusMelanerpes
SpeciesM. lewis

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5. Ladder-backed woodpecker

Ladder-backed woodpecker

The Ladder-backed Woodpecker is a small black and white bird native to North America.

At about 16.5-19 cm in length, it has a characteristic barred pattern on its back resembling the rungs of a ladder, as well as speckled black rump and cream colored underparts on its breast and flanks.

These birds can be found inhabiting woodlands across their range, where they feed mostly on insects that they find by drilling into trees or hunting from exposed branches.

Their call consists of short chirps repeated every few seconds with an occasional longer trill thrown in for good measure.

They are also known to use twigs or other objects to probe crevices while searching for food - making them quite resourceful hunters indeed.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusDryobates
SpeciesD. scalaris

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6. Red-naped sapsucker

Red-naped sapsucker

The Red-naped Sapsucker is a medium sized woodpecker native to North America. It was initially thought to be a subspecies of the yellow-bellied sapsucker, but it has since been identified as its own species.

This bird belongs in the genus Sphyrapicus, and does not have any known subspecies. Its distinct red head patch makes this species easy to identify among other birds of its kind.

It can usually be found near conifers or deciduous trees that contain sap wells drilled by these birds for their food source - mainly insects and tree sap.

These birds are also known to eat fruits, berries and nuts during winter months when bug populations decrease significantly.

The Red-naped Sapsucker is an important part of many ecosystems across North America due their unique diet habits which provide essential nutrients needed for plant growth and health; making them a valuable asset in preserving forests everywhere.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusSphyrapicus
SpeciesS. nuchalis

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7. Williamson's sapsucker

Williamson s sapsucker

Williamson's sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker belonging to the Sphyrapicus genus.

It inhabits open coniferous forests, particularly those of ponderosa pine, douglas-fir and grand fir in western North America from northern British Columbia through California and as far east as Idaho.

During winter months it can also be found further south into Mexico. Williamson's sapsuckers feed on arthropods that they drill out from tree bark or sap oozing from their feeding holes—hence its name.

They are an elegant species with glossy black wings patterned by white crescent shaped marks; the back being barred yellowish grey while underparts have fine barring too with chestnut tones around neck area.

In addition, red crowns make males easily distinguishable amongst females who sport dark brown heads instead.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusSphyrapicus
SpeciesS. thyroideus

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8. Red-breasted sapsucker

Red-breasted sapsucker

The red-breasted sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker native to the forests of the west coast of North America.

It has a striking appearance with its bright red head and upper chest, white lower belly, black back and wings with bars and large white wing patch.

These birds nest in tree cavities during mating season while northern specimens migrate south for winter months.

They are often seen tapping on trees to drill holes into them in order to feed on sap or bark insects that live beneath it.

Additionally, they have been observed feeding from birdfeeders which makes them great additions to backyard bird watching activities.

Overall, the red-breasted sapsucker is an interesting species worth discovering.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusSphyrapicus
SpeciesS. ruber

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9. Rock wren

Rock wren

The Rock Wren is a small bird of the wren family, native to western North America, Mexico and Central America.

It features distinct grey-brown upperparts speckled with black and white spots, as well as pale grey underparts featuring a light brown rump.

This species also has an eye line that's lightly gray in color. Additionally, it sports a long slender bill curved slightly downwards at the tip.

The wings are short but broad and rounded off with buffy or whitish colored feathers along their edges.

Its habitat includes rocky areas such as cliffsides or boulders for nesting purposes where these birds can be seen singing loud melodic songs throughout the day.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTroglodytidae
GenusSalpinctes Cabanis, 1847
SpeciesS. obsoletus

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10. California condor

California condor

The California condor is a majestic bird, being the largest North American landbird. It was sadly pushed to extinction in the wild back in 1987 when all remaining individuals were captured.

Since then, conservation efforts have allowed for reintroductions of these birds into areas such as northern Arizona and southern Utah, including Zion National Park and Grand Canyon area; coastal mountains of California; and northern Baja California.

The species has been given plenty of protection with numerous laws created to protect it from human interference or disturbance while also helping boost its population size through captive breeding programs.

Thanks to this effort we can now enjoy seeing this incredible species flying across our skies once more.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderAccipitriformes
FamilyCathartidae
GenusGymnogyps
SpeciesG. californianus

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