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49 Most Common United States Birds

The United States is home to an impressive variety of birds, ranging from small songbirds to large raptors. With habitats ranging from coastlines to deserts, the US provides a wide range of habitats for birds to live in and make their homes.

Not only do the US birds bring beauty to the landscape, but they also provide a valuable role in the ecosystem. From helping to control pests, to being a source of food for other animals, the birds of the United States play an important part in the country's natural environment.

1. Northern cardinal

Northern cardinal

The Northern Cardinal is a beautiful bird, easily identified by its bright red plumage. It can be found in the eastern United States from Maine to Minnesota and south through Mexico and Belize.

Along with its striking colouration, it has a distinctive crest on its head and sharp black facial markings around the eyes.

Despite their small size (measuring 7-9 inches) they are very vocal birds - males sing persistently throughout springtime to attract mates or proclaim their territory.

They typically feed on insects, seeds and fruits but also enjoy suet at backyard bird feeders.

The female is less brightly coloured than her mate but still stands out among other songbirds due to her warm brownish-red feathers.

Cardinals pair for life so you may often see them together in your garden or neighbourhood park.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCardinalidae
GenusCardinalis
SpeciesC. cardinalis

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2. American robin

American robin

The American robin is a migratory bird, belonging to the true thrush genus and Turdidae family.

It was named after its European counterpart due to the similar reddish-orange breast they both possess; however, they are not related closely.

This species can be seen through most of North America during winter months, as well as in parts of Mexico and Central America where it also breeds.

They have plump bodies with gray upperparts and white underparts that vary from yellow on their throats down to orange toward their bellies.

Robins feed on fruits such as berries or insects like worms which makes them an important part of ecosystems by helping disperse seeds naturally throughout these areas.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
GenusTurdus
SpeciesT. migratorius

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3. Northern mockingbird

Northern mockingbird

The northern mockingbird is a common fixture in North American skies. It has greyish-brown upperparts and a paler underside with white wing patches, and its distinctive long tail makes it easy to spot.

This adaptable bird can often be seen singing from the tops of trees or fences, though it rarely strays into Europe.

The species was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1758 Systema Naturae as Turdus polyglottos - aptly named for their remarkable ability to mimic other birds' songs.

Northern mockingbirds typically live on insects, fruits, berries and seeds but they will also happily scavenge food scraps left out by humans.

With its beautiful song and striking plumage this beloved avian makes an important contribution to our environment.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyMimidae
GenusMimus
SpeciesM. polyglottos

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4. American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

The American goldfinch is a small North American bird in the finch family. Males are vibrant yellow with black wings and tail, while females are duller in colouration.

It migrates from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during breeding season, south of Canada–United States border to Mexico for its wintering grounds.

The only finch which undergoes complete molt every year, it displays sexual dichromatism where males have brighter colours than their female counterparts.

They feed mainly on seeds but also eat insects such as aphids and caterpillars when raising youngs; they often occur near thistles or other plants that produce viable seed heads.

Their call consists of an array of chirps and trills making them quite conspicuous.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyFringillidae
SubfamilyCarduelinae
GenusSpinus
SpeciesS. tristis

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5. Songbirds

Songbirds

Songbirds are a special suborder of perching birds found all over the world. These beautiful creatures have intricate vocal organs that allow them to produce elaborate bird songs, making them stand out from other species.

With around 5,000 different types of songbird in existence, they come in various sizes and colors with complex feathers adding to their beauty.

Songbirds play an important role in eco-systems as they help disperse seeds by eating fruit and insects which act as agents for pollination.

Their presence also serves to attract more biodiversity into areas where these delicate animals live, creating vibrant habitats full of life.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
CladeEupasseres
SuborderPasseri Linnaeus, 1758

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6. Western meadowlark

Western meadowlark

The western meadowlark is a medium-sized icterid bird native to North America. It has a distinct yellow breast with black and white patches, making it easy to spot in open grasslands.

Its diet consists of mostly bugs but also includes seeds and berries. The western meadowlark's call is unique - its sound described as flute-like or watery, differentiating it from the similar eastern meadowlark species.

When nesting season arrives, they build their nests on the ground near shrubs or low trees in areas like fields and pastures.

This beautiful songbird adds life to our open lands with its melodious tunes.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusSturnella
SpeciesS. neglecta

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7. Bluebirds

Bluebirds

Bluebirds are a North American species of small to medium-sized birds belonging to the thrush family. They have stunning blue and rose beige plumage, with males having brighter colors than females.

These beautiful birds mainly feed on insects, but they can also eat some fruits or seeds from time to time. Bluebirds reside in open fields, meadows and backyards across much of North America.

Their cheerful songs bring joy as they fly through their habitats looking for food during the day before returning home at nightfall.

The sight of these beautiful creatures is often associated with happiness and hope - making them beloved by many people.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
SubfamilyMyadestinae
GenusSialia Swainson, 1827

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8. Black-capped chickadee

Black-capped chickadee

The black-capped chickadee is a small and cheerful songbird found in deciduous and mixed forests across North America. It has an iconic black cap, white cheeks, gray back and wings with whitish bars on them.

The underparts are usually light colored or greyish brown. This species is well adapted to cold winters as it can reduce its body temperature by up to 8°C while roosting at night; this helps save energy during the colder months of the year.

It feeds mainly on insects but also eats seeds, fruits and suet from bird feeders when available.

Black-capped chickadees are popular birds among backyard visitors due to their sociable nature - they often establish lifelong partnerships with one another for breeding purposes.

Furthermore, they have been designated as state birds of Massachusetts and Maine in USA plus New Brunswick in Canada – a testament to how beloved these little avian friends truly are.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParidae
GenusPoecile
SpeciesP. atricapillus

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9. Mountain bluebird

Mountain bluebird

The Mountain Bluebird is a beautiful sight to behold. It has bright turquoise-blue wings and tail, with a light underbelly, grey crown and breast, black eyes and thin bills.

During the fall season its plumage changes slightly - females have duller blue wings and tail, as well as a grey throat and back.

As they migrate across western North America during springtime these birds can be found in mountainous districts where they feed on insects such as grasshoppers or crickets collected from meadows or fields of grain.

They also enjoy eating berries when available. Through their stunning colours this species adds vibrancy to any landscape it traverses through – truly an incredible creature of nature.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
GenusSialia
SpeciesS. currucoides

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10. California quail

California quail

The California quail is a small, ground-dwelling bird with an iconic drooping crest. Male birds have a dark brown cap and black face while females sport a brown back and white streaks on their flanks.

These quails are found in the western United States and parts of northern Mexico and may gather in groups to feed or dust bathe together during the day.

Their diet consists mainly of grasses, seeds, berries as well as some insects like beetles or ants.

The population has been declining due to habitat loss so conservation efforts are being implemented for this species’ survival.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGalliformes
FamilyOdontophoridae
GenusCallipepla
SpeciesC. californica

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11. Wrens

Wrens

Wrens are a family of small brown passerine birds found mainly in the Americas. They are considered one of the most abundant bird species, with 88 known varieties divided into 19 genera.

The Eurasian wren is the only type that inhabits Europe and other parts of the Old World, where it's commonly referred to simply as "wren."

This species has been given its name due to similar-looking unrelated birds living elsewhere such as New Zealand wrasses.

Wrens have tiny bodies with thin bills and long tails which they often hold upright for hours at a time while singing their loud cheery songs from treetops or low shrubs.

Their diet consists mostly of insects but can also include fruits and seeds depending on availability in their habitat range.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
SuperfamilyCerthioidea
FamilyTroglodytidae Swainson, 1832

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12. Eastern bluebird

Eastern bluebird

The Eastern bluebird is a small migratory thrush that can be found in open woodlands, farms and orchards across North America.

The male has bright-blue breeding plumage which makes it easily recognizable by birders.

It produces melodious songs such as jeew, chir-wi and chiti WEEW wewidoo.

This popular species was declared the state bird of Missouri back in 1927 due to its beauty and charm.

In addition to being beautiful, these birds are also beneficial for farmers because they eat insects like grasshoppers and beetles which damage crops.

They nest in cavities so providing nesting boxes helps them thrive even more.

With their vibrant colors, sweet melodies and helpful nature it's easy to see why the Eastern Bluebird is beloved worldwide.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
GenusSialia
SpeciesS. sialis

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13. Nene

Nene

The Nene is a species of bird endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. It was given its name 'nēnē' due to its soft call and in 1957 it even became the official state bird of Hawaii.

This gorgeous goose can be found exclusively in the wild on islands such as Oahu, Maui, Kauaʻi, Molokai and Hawaiʻi.

The Nene has adapted so well to living within these different island environments that they have developed their own distinct subspecies depending on which island they are from.

These birds are an important part of Hawaiian culture, being featured in many stories throughout history where they were often seen as symbols for protection and good luck - making them truly special creatures indeed.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderAnseriformes
FamilyAnatidae
GenusBranta
SpeciesB. sandvicensis

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14. Baltimore oriole

Baltimore oriole

The Baltimore Oriole is a small, blackbird-like bird found in eastern North America. It's named for the resemblance of its male colors to those on Lord Baltimore’s coat-of-arms from 17th century.

These birds migrate and breed during springtime and are quite common in their habitats.

Studies have shown that this species interbreeds with western Bullock's orioles, leading both to be classified as a single species - Icterus galbula.

The males typically have orange feathers along the chest, back, wings and tail while females display tan or yellowish shades instead of bright orange ones like males do.

Both sexes share white wing bars and dark brown eyes which makes them easily distinguishable among other birds.

They can often be seen flitting around trees feeding off nectar buds or insects such as grasshoppers & caterpillars they catch while flying around.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusIcterus
SpeciesI. galbula

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15. Brown thrasher

Brown thrasher

The brown thrasher is a member of the Mimidae family, along with catbirds and mockingbirds. It is found throughout much of North America in the eastern and central United States as well as southern and central Canada.

The only place that it does not inhabit is west of the Rockies or in Central Texas.

This bird can be identified by its reddish-brown back feathers, white underbelly and long tail that often drags behind it when walking on the ground hunting for food like insects, fruits or berries.

Its loud song consists of over 2000 different notes.

Brown Thrashers are known to build nests close to human activity which makes them easily accessible for observation making them a popular backyard species among many birdwatchers.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyMimidae
GenusToxostoma
SpeciesT. rufum

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16. Common loon

Common loon

The Common Loon is a beautiful bird found in North America. It has a large black head and neck, with a greenish to purple sheen that stands out against its dark grey upperparts.

The underparts are pure white except for some black on the undertail coverts and vent.

During non-breeding season adults have brown plumage instead of the bright shades they show during breeding season.

They also exhibit unique behaviors such as diving underwater to catch fish or swimming along lakeshores while calling loudly, which is how they got their name "great northern diver".

With their stunning colors and interesting behavior, it's no wonder why these birds make up an iconic part of many landscapes across North America.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGaviiformes
FamilyGaviidae
GenusGavia
SpeciesG. immer

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17. Blue jay

Blue jay

The Blue Jay is a beautiful bird that resides in eastern and central United States, as well as Newfoundland Canada.

They have an unmistakable blue colored plumage with white markings on their heads and wings.

These birds are highly adaptable to different habitats ranging from deciduous forests to urban areas.

As part of the Corvidae family, they are known for being intelligent problem solvers who will often use tools or mimic vocalizations of other species like hawks when defending their territories.

Their diet consists mostly of insects, seeds and nuts but can also include small vertebrates such as frogs or lizards if food resources become scarce.

Overall these birds provide much needed color to our environment while playing important roles in maintaining healthy ecosystems through pollination services and seed dispersal activities.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCorvidae
GenusCyanocitta
SpeciesC. cristata

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18. Wild turkey

Wild turkey

Wild turkeys are large birds native to North America, and the heaviest members of the Galliformes order.

They have long reddish-yellow legs with grayish-green feathers which distinguish them from their domesticated cousin.

Their population has been steadily increasing due to conservation efforts since being declared endangered in 1975.

Wild turkeys can be found across forests, meadows and open woodlands where they feed on insects, plant materials and small animals such as lizards or frogs.

As opportunistic omnivores they also take advantage of human food sources when available making them a familiar sight around campgrounds and picnic areas during summer months.

 These majestic creatures often roost in trees at night for protection against predators but will fly off into flocks if disturbed by humans or other nearby threats .

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGalliformes
FamilyPhasianidae
GenusMeleagris
SpeciesM. gallopavo

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19. Cactus wren

Cactus wren

The cactus wren is an enchanting bird found in the deserts of the southwestern United States and northern and central Mexico.

It has a unique brown plumage, with black and white spots as markings, along with a distinctive white eyebrow sweeping to its nape.

Its chest is also snow-white, whereas its belly features light brown bars that contrast nicely against other feathers.

This species holds special significance for Arizona - it was declared their state bird due to its large size compared to other US wrens.

Cactus Wrens are often seen perched atop Saguaro cacti or jumping around on desert ground searching for food such as insects like beetles or spiders.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTroglodytidae
GenusCampylorhynchus
SpeciesC. brunneicapillus

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20. Bald eagle

Bald eagle

The majestic Bald Eagle is a bird of prey found in North America and recognized as the national symbol of the United States.

With its distinctive white head, brown body and striking yellow beak, this sea eagle has two known subspecies that form a species pair with the White-tailed Eagle.

It inhabits much of Canada, Alaska all states in the US contiguous area and Northern Mexico near large bodies of water where they feed mainly on fish.

These birds have an impressive wingspan ranging from 1.8 to 2 meters depending on their size making them one of nature’s most magnificent creatures.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderAccipitriformes
FamilyAccipitridae
GenusHaliaeetus
SpeciesH. leucocephalus

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21. Northern bobwhite

Northern bobwhite

The Northern bobwhite is a ground-dwelling bird native to parts of the Americas, with introduced populations elsewhere in the world.

It belongs to the New World quail family and has a distinctive call that can be heard during mating season or when their territory is threatened.

They have mottled brown plumage which helps them blend into their natural habitats such as grasslands, wooded areas and open fields.

The male birds are slightly larger than females and they feed on small insects, seeds and plants.

These birds form monogamous breeding pairs that stay together throughout most of the year raising several broods each year until migrating south for winter months.

Though declining due to habitat loss, these resilient little birds can still be found living in many places across North America.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGalliformes
FamilyOdontophoridae
GenusColinus
SpeciesC. virginianus

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22. Wood thrush

Wood thrush

The Wood Thrush is a beautiful bird native to North America, closely related to the American Robin.

It has mottled brown and white upperparts with a spotted breast, buffy sides and flanks, and reddish-brown tail feathers.

This medium-sized thrush prefers wooded areas where it can find its favorite food - insects such as beetles, caterpillars and spiders.

The male's song is one of the most recognizable sounds in nature; an ethereal mix of flute-like whistles that often echoes through forests on warm summer nights.

The Wood Thrush holds special status as the official bird of Washington D.C., making it even more beloved amongst local residents who take pride in seeing this exquisite species up close.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
GenusHylocichla Baird, 1864
SpeciesH. mustelina

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23. Peregrine falcon

Peregrine falcon

The Peregrine Falcon is a majestic bird of prey belonging to the family Falconidae. It has a blue-grey back, barred white underparts and black head making it easily recognizable.

This intelligent raptor is known for its incredible speed reaching over 320 km/h (200 mph) during hunting dives – one of the fastest animals in existence.

The peregrine falcon can be found around the world from Arctic tundra to tropical rainforests thriving with humans or in high alpine mountains far away from civilization.

With their beauty, power and adaptability they are an impressive species that have earned respect among many cultures throughout history as symbols of strength and endurance.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderFalconiformes
FamilyFalconidae
GenusFalco
SpeciesF. peregrinus

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24. Turkey

Turkey

Turkey is a large bird native to North America and belongs to the genus Meleagris. It has two species: wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) found in eastern and central North America, while ocellated turkey (Meleagris ocellata) inhabits Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico.

Males have distinctive fleshy wattle known as snood on their beaks which make them easily identifiable.

Turkeys are omnivorous birds, mainly eating seeds, nuts, fruits or plants but also occasionally preying small animals like insects or lizards for food intake.

They typically inhabit open woods and forest clearings where they build nests at ground level by scratching leaves into a shallow depression with wings whirring loudly during courtship displays usually seen between April-May season each year.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGalliformes
FamilyPhasianidae
SubfamilyPhasianinae
TribeTetraonini
GenusMeleagris Linnaeus, 1758

25. New World warblers

New World warblers

New World warblers are an incredibly diverse family of small birds found only in the Americas. They range in size from tiny hummingbirds to large thrushes, and come in a variety of vibrant colors.

All have thin bills made for eating insects which form their main diet. Most species live predominantly arboreal lives, meaning they spend most of their time among trees or bushes searching for food.

However some members such as ovenbirds and waterthrushes prefer more terrestrial habitats like forest floors where they can scavenge for bugs on the ground instead.

Warblers provide a great source of entertainment with their beautiful songs often filling up woodlands during mornings and evenings throughout springtime.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
SuperfamilyEmberizoidea
FamilyParulidae Wetmore et al., 1947

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26. Downy woodpecker

Downy woodpecker

The downy woodpecker is a small species of woodpecker found in North America. Growing up to 7 inches long, it can be identified by its white belly and spotted wings.

It inhabits forests throughout the United States and Canada, with the exception of deserts in the southwest and northern tundra.

This bird nests in tree cavities and feeds mostly on insects but will supplement its diet with fruit or nuts when available.

The Downy Woodpecker has an unmistakable call that sounds like a loud 'pik-er', similar to other members of its family such as the Hairy Woodpecker.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusDryobates
SpeciesD. pubescens

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27. Sandpiper

Sandpiper

Sandpiper is a type of shorebird found in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. It has long legs that are adapted for running through shallow water to feed on invertebrates such as small insects or worms.

They typically have dull-colored plumage with browns, greys and whites being the most common colors seen in sandpipers. Sandpipers can be identified by their pointed bills which they use to probe into mudflats looking for food. 

During breeding season many species will display vibrant coloration including reds and oranges around the neck area; this helps them attract mates during courtship rituals.

The birds migrate long distances each year between their summer breeding grounds at higher latitudes down to wintering sites further south where it’s warmer all year round. 

These adaptive birds nest in large colonies near wetlands and coastal areas making them an important part of wetland ecosystems across the world

Scientific classification:

28. American crow

American crow

The American crow is a large bird of the Corvidae family, native to most parts of North America.

It is similar in size and structure to its European counterpart, the carrion crow, as well as Eurasia's hooded crow.

The three species occupy the same ecological niche, but are distinguishable by their differences in appearance.

American crows have black feathers covering their entire body with wingspan averaging between 17-21 inches wide for males and 16-19 inches for females.

They feed on insects such as grasshoppers, beetles and caterpillars; they also eat grains from fields or abandoned farms during winter months when food sources become scarcer.

In addition to feeding habits American crows can be identified by their distinct call which resembles a "caw" sound that travels long distances over open terrain making them popular among birdwatchers.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCorvidae
GenusCorvus
SpeciesC. brachyrhynchos

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29. House sparrow

House sparrow

The house sparrow is a small bird of the Passeridae family. It has an average length of 16 cm and weighs 24-39.5 gm.

Females have dull brown and grey plumage, whereas males are brighter, with black, white and brown markings on their wings and back feathers.

This species is one among 25 different kinds in its genus Passer .These birds are found all around the world mainly near human dwellings where they feed off food scraps from garbage bins or gardens etc..

They also make nests close to houses which makes them even more visible to people living nearby.

House sparrows can be seen hopping around yards looking for food during daytime hours but usually hide in colonies at night time.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasseridae
GenusPasser
SpeciesP. domesticus

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30. Greater roadrunner

Greater roadrunner

The Greater Roadrunner is a long-legged bird in the Cuculidae family that can be found throughout Aridoamerica. It has many nicknames, including Californian Earth-cuckoo, Chaparral Cock and Snake Killer.

This species is one of two birds belonging to the genus Geococcyx - the other being its smaller counterpart, Lesser Roadrunner.

The Greater Roadrunners are known to eat anything they can catch such as lizards, snakes and insects, making them very valuable predators for keeping pests at bay.

They also have an impressive burst of speed over short distances which helps with hunting prey or escaping danger quickly.

With their large eyes and distinctive black tip on their tail feathers, these amazing creatures make quite an impression when spotted out in nature.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCuculiformes
FamilyCuculidae
GenusGeococcyx
SpeciesG. californianus

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31. Red-bellied woodpecker

Red-bellied woodpecker

The Red-bellied woodpecker is a beautiful bird with an orange-red crown and nape. It breeds mainly in the eastern United States, ranging from Florida to Canada.

This medium-sized woodpecker of the family Picidae has black wings, white stripes on its back and tail feathers that are barred with black.

Its underside is mostly pale yellow or white but it also features some red coloration around its neck area.

Despite this subtle red hue, it should not be mistaken for the entirely red head and neck belonging to the Red-headed woodpecker of the same genus Melanerpes carolinus.

The Red bellied Woodpeckers diet consists primarily of insects such as ants, beetles and grasshoppers along with nuts fruits berries and tree sap which they will feed upon during different times throughout their life cycle.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusMelanerpes
SpeciesM. carolinus

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32. House finch

House finch

The House Finch is a species of finch native to western North America and has been introduced in the eastern half of the continent as well as Hawaii.

It's an average-sized finch with adults measuring 12.5 - 15 cm (5 - 6 inches) long and having wingspans between 20 – 25 cm (8 – 10 inches).

The upperparts are brown, while its underparts range from pale grayish white to yellow depending on subspecies.

Its face is streaked or spotted with reddish coloration; males typically have brighter plumage than females due to sexual dimorphism.

They're mostly found near human habitations such as farms and gardens where they feed on grains, fruits, insects etc., making them very popular among birders who want something colorful for their backyard.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyFringillidae
SubfamilyCarduelinae
GenusHaemorhous
SpeciesH. mexicanus

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33. Dark-eyed junco

Dark-eyed junco

The Dark-eyed Junco is a species of small, grayish sparrows that are found across much of temperate North America and in the Arctic during summer.

It was formally described by Carl Linnaeus in 1766, who named it after its distinctive dark eyes.

This bird has a very variable appearance due to the many different subspecies it contains, making its systematics difficult to unravel.

The plumage varies from white or light gray on their underparts with slate grey backs and wings; black heads with white outer tail feathers; brown head stripes; yellow bills; pink legs and feet; as well as various shades between all these colours.

They also have considerable sexual dimorphism where males tend to be more colourful than females but share similar characteristics such as short tails and rounded bodies – both sexes being around 16 cm long when fully grown.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasserellidae
GenusJunco
SpeciesJ. hyemalis

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34. Common starling

Common starling

The Common Starling is a medium-sized passerine bird that belongs to the starling family. It has glossy black plumage with a metallic sheen, and in certain times of year it can be speckled with white.

The bill and legs are typically pink or black depending on the season, while its length measures about 8 inches long.

Its diet consists mainly of insects but also includes small fruits and seeds as well as some human food waste.

They live in large flocks which provides protection against predators, although they can become quite aggressive when defending their nesting sites during breeding seasons.

Overall, this species is highly adaptable and widely distributed across many parts of Europe making them one of the most successful birds in the region today.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilySturnidae
GenusSturnus
SpeciesS. vulgaris

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35. Mourning dove

Mourning dove

The Mourning Dove is a breathtakingly beautiful bird. It has stunning gray and brown feathers with white tipped wings, giving it an elegant appearance. Its long tail also adds to its graceful look in flight.

A symbol of peace and serenity, they are abundant across North America and can be found in gardens or open fields throughout the year.

As well as being popular game birds for hunters, they feed on grains such as wheat and millet providing important food sources for wildlife species including foxes, coyotes, skunks and raccoons.

These doves have a distinctive cooing sound that can often be heard echoing through woodlands during summer evenings making them one of nature's greatest treasures.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderColumbiformes
FamilyColumbidae
GenusZenaida
SpeciesZ. macroura

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36. Tufted titmouse

Tufted titmouse

The Tufted Titmouse is a small, cheerful songbird found in North America. It's part of the tit and chickadee family (Paridae).

It has distinctive white feathers around its eyes, grey-brown wings and upper body, with a pale tan underside.

Its most notable feature is the black crest on top of its head that gives it an inquisitive look. The male also sports a pinkish breast which can be seen.

When singing from high perches during the spring months. This bird loves to eat sunflower seeds or suet at backyard feeders as well as insects in summertime.

You may even see them poking into crevices and bark looking for food.

They are quite social birds too, being often spotted in mixed flocks alongside other species such as nuthatches and woodpeckers all year round.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParidae
GenusBaeolophus
SpeciesB. bicolor

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37. White-breasted nuthatch

White-breasted nuthatch

The White-breasted Nuthatch is a medium-sized bird belonging to the nuthatch family Sittidae. It measures around 15.5 cm in length and its colour varies throughout its range.

Males have a light blue-grey upperpart, with black crown and nape whereas females have a dark grey crown instead of black one.

The underparts are whitish, with reddish tinge on sides and flanks while the bill is short and stout with pale base near eyes which can be yellow or white depending upon geographic location..

This species feeds mainly on insects but will also eat seeds, nuts and berries when available.

They prefer open woodlands where they often climb trees searching for food along trunks as well as branches underneath bark crevices creating their nest there too.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilySittidae
GenusSitta
SpeciesS. carolinensis

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38. Plovers

Plovers

Plovers are a family of around 64-68 species of ground-dwelling birds, commonly found in open country such as fields, meadows and tundras.

They have short bills with webbed feet to help them forage through mud or shallow water.

Plover plumage is usually mottled brown though some species may have brighter colors on the head and wings.

These birds feed mainly on insects but can also eat small crustaceans and worms.

Plovers breed during springtime when they dig holes in sandy or pebbled beaches to lay their eggs which hatch after about 3 weeks incubation period.

They use distraction display behaviour by pretending an injury to the predators away from their nests if needed for protecting their young ones.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCharadriiformes
FamilyCharadriidae Leach, 1820

39. Anna's hummingbird

Anna s hummingbird

Anna's hummingbird is a beautiful species of bird belonging to the Trochilidae family. Native to western coastal regions of North America, it was named after Anna Masséna, Duchess of Rivoli.

In the early 20th century, these birds bred only in northern Baja California and southern California but due to ornamental plant transplanting they can now be found across much of Pacific Coast region.

They are medium-sized with bright emerald green feathers on their back and crowns as well as rose-red patches at the throat for males which makes them quite distinguishable from other birds.

Their diet consists mainly nectar from flowers although they will occasionally feed on insects or spiders too making them important pollinators that help maintain healthy ecosystems.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderApodiformes
FamilyTrochilidae
GenusCalypte
SpeciesC. anna

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40. Allen's hummingbird

Allen s hummingbird

Allen's Hummingbird is a beautiful species of hummingbird that breeds in the western United States. It stands only 3-3.5 inches long and its stunningly vibrant plumage make it an incredible sight to behold.

The male has a green back and forehead, with rust-colored (rufous) flanks, rump, and tail while his throat dazzles with an iridescent orange coloration.

Females are similarly colored but lack the colorful throat patch of males.

These birds feed primarily on nectar from flowers such as sagebrush, California fuchsia or currant bushes using their long bills and tongues to extract food from deep within them.

They also eat small insects for protein which they capture in flight like other hummingbirds do.

Allen’s Hummingbird can be found near chaparral shrubland during breeding season when wildflowers abound giving these tiny beauties plenty of sustenance.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderApodiformes
FamilyTrochilidae
GenusSelasphorus
SpeciesS. sasin

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41. Rhode Island Red

Rhode Island Red

The Rhode Island Red is an iconic American breed of chicken. It was developed in Rhode Island and Massachusetts during the late 19th century by cross-breeding Oriental birds such as the Malay with Italian brown Leghorn varieties.

These dual purpose chickens were used for both meat production and egg laying, though modern strains have been bred specifically for their strong egg-laying ability. 

The beautiful reddish feathers are one of its most distinguishing characteristics, earning it a place as the state bird of Rhode Island.

Its hardy nature makes them well suited to many climates and living conditions, making it an ideal choice for small backyard flocks or larger commercial operations alike.

Scientific classification:

42. California gull

California gull

The California Gull is a medium-sized bird, smaller than the herring gull but larger than the ring-billed gull. It has a yellow bill with black ring and yellow legs.

Its head is rounder compared to other gulls and its body mainly white in color with grey back and wings.

They are mostly found around lakes, rivers or coasts of western North America where there is plenty of food available for them such as fish, insects and crustaceans which they consume on their daily diet.

During breeding season these birds form large colonies near water bodies or wetlands where they also make their nests using grasses sticks or feathers.

As omnivores they play an important role in maintaining balance within local ecosystems by eating both plants material like seeds & fruits as well as small mammals like rodents.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderCharadriiformes
FamilyLaridae
GenusLarus
SpeciesL. californicus

43. New World quail

New World quail

New World quail are small birds found in the Americas, from Canada to Brazil. They belong to their own family, Odontophoridae, and have similar appearance and habits as Old World quail which belong to a different family.

New World Quails come in various species such as California Quail and Bobwhite Quail.

These birds have adapted well to human presence due to availability of food resources like agricultural crops.

They also live close together where they form large flocks for safety against predators like foxes or hawks.

The males usually sport colorful feathers during mating season that helps them attract female mates while providing an amazing sight for us viewers.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGalliformes
SuperfamilyPhasianoidea
FamilyOdontophoridae Gould, 1844

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44. Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds are tiny birds found throughout the Americas, from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. Most species measure between 3-5 inches in length and weigh less than an ounce.

The smallest hummingbird is only 2 inches long. Hummingbirds have a unique ability of hovering by rapidly flapping their wings up to 80 times per second.

They feed on nectar and insects, with some species even able to drink sap or eat pollen directly off flowers.

Their vibrant colors make them instantly recognizable as they dart through gardens in search of food and mates.

Hummingbirds truly bring joy into our lives as they remind us that nature’s beauty can be seen around every corner if we take the time to look for it.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderApodiformes
FamilyTrochilidae Vigors, 1825

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45. Ruffed grouse

Ruffed grouse

The Ruffed Grouse is a medium-sized bird native to forests from the Appalachian Mountains across Canada to Alaska.

It has an impressive range and is widely distributed throughout North America, making it one of the most abundant game birds in the region.

Unlike many other grouse species, this bird does not migrate and remains in its chosen habitat year round. The Ruffed Grouse has unique features that set it apart from similar birds.

Its feathers are ruffled like fur giving it a soft look; and its tail can be spread out into an umbrella shape when threatened or startled by predators.

This beautiful creature makes for great hunting opportunities with plenty of success stories among seasoned hunters – but only if they know what they’re doing.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderGalliformes
FamilyPhasianidae
TribeTetraonini
GenusBonasa Stephens, 1819
SpeciesB. umbellus

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46. Red-winged blackbird

Red-winged blackbird

The red-winged blackbird is a beautiful bird found in most of North America and Central America.

Its distinct features include a glossy black body, with white shoulder patches and bright red wing coverts year round.

It prefers wetland habitats such as marshes, ponds, lakeshores and agricultural fields. During breeding season they inhabit grassy areas near water then move south for the winter months.

For food they mainly eat insects but also consume wild fruit or grains.

They are very social birds often seen in large flocks during migration times when their unmistakable "conk-la-ree" call can be heard echoing across the sky.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusAgelaius
SpeciesA. phoeniceus

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47. Carolina wren

Carolina wren

The Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) is a medium-sized bird that can be found in the eastern United States, southern Ontario and northeast Mexico.

They typically live in dense shrubbery or thickets near open areas such as gardens, parks and woodland edges.

These birds are quite adaptable when it comes to nesting sites - they will build their nests anywhere from tree cavities to manmade boxes.

Their diet consists of insects, spiders and other invertebrates which they forage for on the ground or among vegetation.

The males have an unmistakable song made up of loud whistles interspersed with trills reminiscent of laughter; you'll often find these cheerful little birds singing away during early morning hours.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTroglodytidae
GenusThryothorus Vieillot, 1816[2]
SpeciesT. ludovicianus

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48. Acorn woodpecker

Acorn woodpecker

The Acorn woodpecker is a medium-sized bird with an average weight of 85 grams and 8.3 inches in length. It was first described by the English naturalist William John Swainson from a specimen collected in Mexico, back in 1827.

Its scientific name, Melanerpes formicivorus, combines Latin words meaning "ant" and "-vorous".

This species has distinct black plumage all over its body except for some white patches on their wings and tail feathers which can be seen when flying or perched atop trees.

They are known to store acorns inside tree crevices as well as within bark cracks - often using them during lean times.

The acorn woodpecker is also socially active; they live together with other birds of their kind in groups called 'granaries'. Their chirps are loud enough that they can easily be heard from afar.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusMelanerpes
SpeciesM. formicivorus

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49. Eastern towhee

Eastern towhee

The Eastern Towhee is a large New World sparrow, native to brushy areas of eastern North America. These birds have distinct black and white markings, with chestnut brown underparts.

They nest either low in bushes or on the ground beneath shrubs. Northern towhees are known for migrating south during the winter months.

In recent decades, taxonomy debates have left some questioning whether this bird should remain its own species or be grouped together with the Spotted Towhee as one species -- Rufous-sided Towhee.

This lively songbird has a bubbly personality and can often be seen hopping around on branches looking for food such as insects, fruits and seeds.

Scientific classification:
KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyPasserellidae
GenusPipilo
SpeciesP. erythrophthalmus

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