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A Birdwatcher’s Paradise: 51 Amazing Birds You Can Find in Mississippi and Where to See Them

Mississippi is home to a diverse range of avian species, making it a paradise for bird watchers and nature enthusiasts alike.

The state’s various habitats, including forests, grasslands, wetlands, and coastal areas, provide an ideal breeding ground and stopover location for a huge variety of birds.

Mississippi is a hub for migratory birds during the spring and fall, as they fly to and from their summer and winter homes.

Mississippi’s year-round inhabitants include the bald eagle, the state’s official bird, the brown pelican, the northern cardinal, and the wild turkey.

The state’s unique position gives bird lovers ample opportunities for bird watching, education, and conservation.

In this article, we will explore the bird species that call Mississippi home, highlighting their characteristics, habitat, and behaviors.

1. Northern Cardinal

Northern cardinal

The Northern Cardinal is a beautiful bird, easily identified by its bright red plumage. It can be found in the eastern United States from Maine to Minnesota and south through Mexico and Belize.

Along with its striking coloration, it has a distinctive crest on its head and sharp black facial markings around the eyes.

Despite their small size (measuring 7-9 inches), they are very vocal birds – males sing persistently throughout springtime to attract mates or proclaim their territory.

They typically feed on insects, seeds, and fruits but also enjoy suet at backyard bird feeders.

The female is less brightly colored than her mate but still stands out among other songbirds due to her warm brownish-red feathers.

Cardinals pair for life so you may often see them together in your garden or neighborhood park.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Cardinalidae
Genus Cardinals
Species C. cardinals

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2. American Robin

American robin

The American robin is a migratory bird, belonging to the true thrush genus and Turdidae family.

It was named after its European counterpart due to the similar reddish-orange breast they both possess; however, they are not related closely.

This species can be seen through most of North America during winter months, as well as in parts of Mexico and Central America where it also breeds.

They have plump bodies with gray upperparts and white underparts that vary from yellow on their throats down to orange toward their bellies.

Robins feed on fruits such as berries or insects like worms which makes them an important part of ecosystems by helping disperse seeds naturally throughout these areas.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Turdidae
Genus Turdus
Species T. migratorius

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3. Northern Mockingbird

Northern mockingbird

The northern mockingbird is a common fixture in North American skies. It has greyish-brown upperparts and a paler underside with white wing patches, and its distinctive long tail makes it easy to spot.

This adaptable bird can often be seen singing from the tops of trees or fences, though it rarely strays into Europe.

The species was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1758 Systema Naturae as Turdus polyglottos – aptly named for their remarkable ability to mimic other birds’ songs.

Northern mockingbirds typically live on insects, fruits, berries, and seeds but they will also happily scavenge food scraps left out by humans.

With its beautiful song and striking plumage, this beloved avian makes an important contribution to our environment.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Mimidae
Genus Mimus
Species M. polyglottos

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4. American Goldfinch

The American goldfinch is a small North American bird in the finch family. Males are vibrant yellow with black wings and tails, while females are duller in coloration.

It migrates from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during the breeding season, south of Canada–United States border to Mexico for its wintering grounds.

The only finch which undergoes complete molt every year displays sexual dichromatism where males have brighter colors than their female counterparts.

They feed mainly on seeds but also eat insects such as aphids and caterpillars when raising young; they often occur near thistles or other plants that produce viable seed heads.

Their call consists of an array of chirps and trills making them quite conspicuous.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Fringillidae
Subfamily Carduelinae
Genus Spinus
Species S. tristis

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5. Eastern Bluebird

Eastern bluebird

The Eastern bluebird is a small migratory thrush that can be found in open woodlands, farms, and orchards across North America.

The male has bright-blue breeding plumage which makes it easily recognizable by birders.

It produces melodious songs such as jeew, chir-wi, and chiti WEEW wewidoo.

This popular species was declared the state bird of Missouri back in 1927 due to its beauty and charm.

In addition to being beautiful, these birds are also beneficial for farmers because they eat insects like grasshoppers and beetles which damage crops.

They nest in cavities so providing nesting boxes helps them thrive even more.

With their vibrant colors, sweet melodies, and helpful nature it’s easy to see why the Eastern Bluebird is beloved worldwide.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Turdidae
Genus Sialia
Species S. sialis

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6. Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore oriole

The Baltimore Oriole is a small, blackbird-like bird found in eastern North America. It’s named for the resemblance of its male colors to those on Lord Baltimore’s coat-of-arms from the 17th century.

These birds migrate and breed during springtime and are quite common in their habitats.

Studies have shown that this species interbreeds with western Bullock’s orioles, leading both to be classified as a single species – Icterus galbula.

The males typically have orange feathers along the chest, back, wings, and tail while females display tan or yellowish shades instead of bright orange ones like males do.

Both sexes share white wing bars and dark brown eyes which makes them easily distinguishable among other birds.

They can often be seen flitting around trees feeding off nectar buds or insects such as grasshoppers & caterpillars they catch while flying around.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Icteridae
Genus Icterus
Species I. galbula

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7. Brown Thrasher

Brown thrasher

The brown thrasher is a member of the Mimidae family, along with catbirds and mockingbirds. It is found throughout much of North America in the eastern and central United States as well as southern and central Canada.

The only place that it does not inhabit is west of the Rockies or in Central Texas.

This bird can be identified by its reddish-brown back feathers, white underbelly, and long tail that often drags behind it when walking on the ground hunting for food like insects, fruits, or berries.

Its loud song consists of over 2000 different notes.

Brown Thrashers are known to build nests close to human activity which makes them easily accessible for observation making them a popular backyard species among many birdwatchers.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Mimidae
Genus Toxostoma
Species T. rufum

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8. Blue Jay

Blue jay

The Blue Jay is a beautiful bird that resides in the eastern and central United States, as well as Newfoundland Canada.

They have an unmistakable blue colored plumage with white markings on their heads and wings.

These birds are highly adaptable to different habitats ranging from deciduous forests to urban areas.

As part of the Corvidae family, they are known for being intelligent problem solvers who will often use tools or mimic vocalizations of other species like hawks when defending their territories.

Their diet consists mostly of insects, seeds, and nuts but can also include small vertebrates such as frogs or lizards if food resources become scarce.

Overall these birds provide much-needed color to our environment while playing important roles in maintaining healthy ecosystems through pollination services and seed dispersal activities.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Corvidae
Genus Cyanocitta
Species C. cristata

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9. New World Warblers

New World warblers

New World warblers are an incredibly diverse family of small birds found only in the Americas. They range in size from tiny hummingbirds to large thrushes and come in a variety of vibrant colors.

All have thin bills made for eating insects which form their main diet. Most species live predominantly arboreal lives, meaning they spend most of their time among trees or bushes searching for food.

However, some members such as ovenbirds and waterthrushes prefer more terrestrial habitats like forest floors where they can scavenge for bugs on the ground instead.

Warblers provide a great source of entertainment with their beautiful songs often filling up woodlands during mornings and evenings throughout springtime.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Superfamily Emberizoidea
Family Parulidae Wetmore et al., 1947

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10. Downy Woodpecker

The downy woodpecker is a small species of woodpecker found in North America. Growing up to 7 inches long, it can be identified by its white belly and spotted wings.

It inhabits forests throughout the United States and Canada, except deserts in the southwest and northern tundra.

This bird nests in tree cavities and feeds mostly on insects but will supplement its diet with fruit or nuts when available.

The Downy Woodpecker has an unmistakable call that sounds like a loud ‘pik-er’, similar to other members of its family such as the Hairy Woodpecker.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Piciformes
Family Picidae
Genus Dryobates
Species D. pubescens

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11. American Crow

American crow

The American crow is a large bird of the Corvidae family, native to most parts of North America.

It is similar in size and structure to its European counterpart, the carrion crow, as well as Eurasia’s hooded crow.

The three species occupy the same ecological niche but are distinguishable by their differences in appearance.

American crows have black feathers covering their entire body with wingspan averaging between 17-21 inches wide for males and 16-19 inches for females.

They feed on insects such as grasshoppers, beetles, and caterpillars; they also eat grains from fields or abandoned farms during winter months when food sources become scarcer.

In addition to feeding habits, American crows can be identified by their distinct call which resembles a “caw” sound that travels long distances over open terrain making them popular among birdwatchers.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Corvidae
Genus Corvus
Species C. brachyrhynchos

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12. Red-bellied Woodpecker

The Red-bellied woodpecker is a beautiful bird with an orange-red crown and nape. It breeds mainly in the eastern United States, ranging from Florida to Canada.

This medium-sized woodpecker of the family Picidae has black wings, white stripes on its back, and tail feathers that are barred with black.

Its underside is mostly pale yellow or white but it also features some red coloration around its neck area.

Despite this subtle red hue, it should not be mistaken for the entirely red head and neck belonging to the Red-headed woodpecker of the same genus Melanerpes carolinus.

The Red-bellied Woodpeckers diet consists primarily of insects such as ants, beetles, and grasshoppers along with nuts fruits berries, and tree sap which they will feed upon at different times throughout their life cycle.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Piciformes
Family Picidae
Genus Melanerpes
Species M. carolinus

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13. House Finch

House finch

The House Finch is a species of finch native to western North America and has been introduced in the eastern half of the continent as well as Hawaii.

It’s an average-sized finch with adults measuring 12.5 – 15 cm (5 – 6 inches) long and having wingspans between 20 – 25 cm (8 – 10 inches).

The upperparts are brown, while its underparts range from pale grayish white to yellow depending on subspecies.

Its face is streaked or spotted with reddish coloration; males typically have brighter plumage than females due to sexual dimorphism.

They’re mostly found near human habitations such as farms and gardens where they feed on grains, fruits, insects, etc., making them very popular among birders who want something colorful for their backyard.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Fringillidae
Subfamily Carduelinae
Genus Haemorhous
Species H. mexicanus

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14. Mourning Dove

The Mourning Dove is a breathtakingly beautiful bird. It has stunning gray and brown feathers with white-tipped wings, giving it an elegant appearance. Its long tail also adds to its graceful look in flight.

A symbol of peace and serenity, they are abundant across North America and can be found in gardens or open fields throughout the year.

As well as being popular game birds for hunters, they feed on grains such as wheat and millet providing important food sources for wildlife species including foxes, coyotes, skunks, and raccoons.

These doves have a distinctive cooing sound that can often be heard echoing through woodlands during summer evenings making them one of nature’s greatest treasures.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Columbiformes
Family Columbidae
Genus Zenaida
Species Z. macroura

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15. Tufted Titmouse

Tufted titmouse

The Tufted Titmouse is a small, cheerful songbird found in North America. It’s part of the tit and chickadee family (Paridae).

It has distinctive white feathers around its eyes, grey-brown wings, and upper body, with a pale tan underside.

Its most notable feature is the black crest on top of its head which gives it an inquisitive look. The male also sports a pinkish breast which can be seen.

When singing from high perches during the spring months. This bird loves to eat sunflower seeds or suet at backyard feeders as well as insects in summertime.

You may even see them poking into crevices and bark looking for food.

They are quite social birds too, being often spotted in mixed flocks alongside other species such as nuthatches and woodpeckers all year round.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Paridae
Genus Baeolophus
Species B. bicolor

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16. White-Breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted nuthatch

The White-breasted Nuthatch is a medium-sized bird belonging to the nuthatch family Sittidae. It measures around 15.5 cm in length and its color varies throughout its range.

Males have a light blue-grey upperpart, with a black crown and nape whereas females have a dark grey crown instead of a black one.

The underparts are whitish, with a reddish tinge on the sides and flanks while the bill is short and stout with a pale base near the eyes which can be yellow or white depending upon geographic location..

This species feeds mainly on insects but will also eat seeds, nuts, and berries when available.

They prefer open woodlands where they often climb trees searching for food along trunks as well as branches underneath bark crevices creating their nest there too.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Sittidae
Genus Sitta
Species S. carolinensis

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17. Red-Winged Blackbird

Red-winged blackbird

The red-winged blackbird is a beautiful bird found in most of North America and Central America.

Its distinct features include a glossy black body, with white shoulder patches and bright red wing coverts year round.

It prefers wetland habitats such as marshes, ponds, lakeshores, and agricultural fields. During breeding season they inhabit grassy areas near water then move south for the winter months.

For food, they mainly eat insects but also consume wild fruit or grains.

They are very social birds often seen in large flocks during migration times when their unmistakable “conk-la-ree” call can be heard echoing across the sky.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Icteridae
Genus Agelaius
Species A. phoeniceus

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18. Carolina Wren

Carolina wren

The Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) is a medium-sized bird that can be found in the eastern United States, southern Ontario, and northeast Mexico.

They typically live in dense shrubbery or thickets near open areas such as gardens, parks, and woodland edges.

These birds are quite adaptable when it comes to nesting sites – they will build their nests anywhere from tree cavities to manmade boxes.

Their diet consists of insects, spiders, and other invertebrates which they forage for on the ground or among vegetation.

The males have an unmistakable song made up of loud whistles interspersed with trills reminiscent of laughter; you’ll often find these cheerful little birds singing away during early morning hours.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Troglodytidae
Genus Thryothorus Vieillot, 1816[2]
Species T. ludovicianus

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19. Eastern Towhee

The Eastern Towhee is a large New World sparrow, native to brushy areas of eastern North America. These birds have distinct black and white markings, with chestnut brown underparts.

They nest either low in bushes or on the ground beneath shrubs. Northern towhees are known for migrating south during the winter months.

In recent decades, taxonomy debates have left some questioning whether this bird should remain its species or be grouped with the Spotted Towhee as one species — Rufous-sided Towhee.

This lively songbird has a bubbly personality and can often be seen hopping around on branches looking for food such as insects, fruits, and seeds.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Passerellidae
Genus Pipilo
Species P. erythrophthalmus

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20. Chipping Sparrow

Chipping sparrow

The Chipping Sparrow is a small passerine bird found across most of North America. It has two subspecies, the eastern and western chipping sparrows which migrate seasonally to overwinter in warmer climates.

The birds are grey above with white underparts, have a rufous cap with black stripes, and large eyes surrounded by light brown feathers.

They feed mainly on seeds but can also be seen eating insects during breeding season when raising their young chicks.

These intrepid little birds live in open grasslands such as prairies or meadows where they build cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs to raise their young family.

Their cheerful song often sounds like ‘chips’ hence its name; Chipping Sparrow.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Passerellidae
Genus Spizella
Species S. passerina

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21. Brown-Headed Cowbird

Brown-headed cowbird

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a small, obligate brood parasitic icterid native to temperate and subtropical North America. It has a brown head with glossy black plumage on the body, wings, and tail feathers.

During summer months it can be found in prairies, grasslands as well as open wooded areas but during winter they migrate southwards towards the United States of Mexico for warmer climates.

They are mainly insectivorous birds that feed on insects like caterpillars or beetles but also consume some grains.

The female bird lays its eggs in nests of other species and then incubates them until hatching time thus leaving their chicks uncared for by themselves.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Icteridae
Genus Molothrus
Species M. ater

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22. Yellow-Rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped warbler

The Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) is a migratory bird species that can be found throughout North America.

It has an extensive range, from the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of the US to Canada and Central America, with a concentration in northern areas during the breeding season.

These birds migrate southwards for wintering grounds where they find plentiful food sources such as insects and berries.

They are easily identified by their yellow patches on either side of their tails, along with white underparts, gray back feathers, and two distinct crown stripes.

One black or greyish-brown above the eyes extends towards its neck banded in yellow or light brown coloration.

Furthermore, these warblers have strong legs which allow them to cling onto branches while hunting for prey making them adept at maneuvering through tree cover quickly.

Altogether this makes the Yellow-rumped Warbler an attractive backyard visitor year-round.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Parulidae
Genus Setophaga
Species S. coronata

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23. Common Grackle

Common grackle

The Common Grackle is a large icterid bird commonly found in North America. It has an iridescent head and pale yellow eyes, which are framed by its long dark bill and long tail.

Males typically have more vivid colors on their heads than females do. These birds can be seen across much of the continent, in fields, forests, wetlands – even urban areas.

They form huge flocks to search for food such as grains or insects that they catch with their bills.

The grackles may also scavenge from human sources like garbage dumps or picnic tables if available. With its colorful plumage and distinct call it’s easy to spot this species amongst other birds.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Icteridae
Genus Quiscalus
Species Q. quiscula

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24. White-Throated Sparrow

White-throated sparrow

The White-throated Sparrow is a small passerine bird of the New World sparrow family Passerellidae.

It has distinctive yellow and black stripes on its head, white throat, and chest with grey back and wings, along with light brown legs.

The scientific name “Zonotrichia albicollis” comes from Ancient Greek for ‘band’ (ζώνη) referring to its distinctive striped crown, and Latin for ‘white neck’ (albus collum).

These birds are usually found in wooded areas such as coniferous forests or deciduous habitats in North America where they feed mainly on insects during summer months; transitioning to seeds during winter.

They build their nests near ground level using grasses, twigs, or moss lined with feathers.

White-throated Sparrows may be solitary but also form flocks when migrating southward each fall season which typically occurs over mid-late October through November depending on location within range.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Passerellidae
Genus Zonotrichia
Species Z. albicollis

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25. Song Sparrow

Song sparrow

The Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) is a small, yet abundant bird found in North America.

They have brown upperparts with dark streaks and are white underneath, complete with a distinct dark brown spot on the breast.

Their cap is also brown and long roughed feathers can be seen sprouting from their neck area.

This sparrow species is highly variable and adaptable to many different environments including dry brush land, wetlands, or open fields.

It has been noted that adult song sparrows will sing even during winter months when other birds remain quiet.

These energetic little animals make for great backyard companions as they flit about singing their lovely melodies.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Passerellidae
Genus Melospiza
Species M. melodia

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26. Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated woodpecker

The pileated woodpecker is a large, majestic bird native to North America.

Its striking black plumage and red crest make it an unmistakable sight in the forest canopy of deciduous forests across eastern North America, the Great Lakes region, Canada’s boreal forests, and parts of the Pacific Coast.

It is one of the largest woodpeckers in North America: larger than any other confirmed species except for perhaps its relative; the ivory-billed woodpecker.

Insectivorous by nature, this stunning creature can be seen pecking away at tree trunks searching for food, or making nest cavities – all with remarkable skill.

The pileated woodpecker truly stands out as a symbol of beauty and resilience amongst our avian wildlife.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Piciformes
Family Picidae
Genus Dryocopus
Species D. pileatus

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27. Ruddy Turnstone

Ruddy turnstone

The Ruddy Turnstone is a small wading bird, belonging to the sandpiper family Scolopacidae. It has an attractive reddish-brown coloration and black patches on its back and wings.

This species breeds in northern parts of Eurasia and North America during the summertime before migrating southwards in the winter season to coastlines all over the world.

The Ruddy Turnstone feeds mainly on insects, mollusks, crustaceans, worms, and some plant material such as seeds or berries which it finds by probing into mudflats with its bill.

It also uses stones for turning them when searching for food under rocks or pebbles along shorelines where they can often be seen darting around looking very busy.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Charadriiformes
Family Scolopacidae
Genus Arenaria
Species A. interpres

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28. Pine Warbler

Pine warbler

The Pine Warbler is a small bird from the New World Warbler family, with an olive-brown upperparts and white belly.

Its distinguishing features include two white wing bars, dark legs, thin pointed bills, and yellowish ‘spectacles’ around its eyes.

Adult males have bright yellow throats and breasts on top of their olive upper parts; females and immatures are less vibrant in color but retain similar characteristics.

These birds can be found near pine forests throughout North America during the summer months before migrating to warmer climates for winter.

They feed mainly on insects such as caterpillars, spiders, and flies while also consuming fruits like blueberries when food becomes scarce in colder times of the year.

All in all, these tiny songbirds provide us with much beauty through their unique plumage patterns whilst serving important roles within their ecosystems.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Parulidae
Genus Setophaga
Species S. pinus

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29. Red-Tailed Hawk

Red-tailed hawk

The Red-tailed Hawk is a majestic bird of prey with a distinctive red tail. It can be found throughout North America, from Alaska in the north to Panama and the West Indies in the south.

This species belongs to the Buteo genus, which makes it one of the most common raptors on Earth.

These hawks mainly hunt small mammals such as rabbits or squirrels but also feed on reptiles and birds during migration season.

Unlike other predator birds, they prefer open areas for hunting like fields or grasslands rather than dense forests.

They build their nests high up on trees where they stay all year long unless disturbed by humans or animals nearby.

Their presence has become an iconic part of American culture due to their frequent sightings around homes and parks alike making them beloved creatures among people everywhere.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Accipitriformes
Family Accipitridae
Genus Buteo
Species B. jamaicensis

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30. Blue Grosbeak

The Blue Grosbeak is a medium-sized North American passerine bird from the Cardinalidae family. It has striking plumage, with males showing off an impressive blue coloration and two brown wing bars.

Females are mainly brown with scattered blue feathers on the upperparts, but they also have two brown wing bars like males do.

During summer months these birds can be found in northern Mexico and the southern United States where they breed, while during wintertime they migrate to Central America for resting purposes.

This beautiful species of bird is easy to spot due to its vibrant colors making it a popular sight amongst wildlife observers.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Cardinalidae
Genus Passerina
Species P. caerulea

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31. Carolina Chickadee

Carolina chickadee

The Carolina Chickadee is a small passerine bird found in the tit family Paridae. It stands out for its distinct black and white, grey-brown feathers with an off-white underside.

This species can be spotted by its call: “chick-a-dee”. The American Ornithologists’ Union has classified them into their genus called Poecile as they differ from other tits due to both genetic data and morphology.

These birds are found all over North America, living in wooded areas near open fields or water sources.

They feed on insects such as caterpillars but also have been known to eat suet at backyard feeders during winter months when food is scarce.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Paridae
Genus Poecile
Species P. carolinensis

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32. Brown-Headed Nuthatch

The brown-headed nuthatch is a small songbird native to pine forests in the southeastern US. With its brown head and blue-gray body, it’s easily recognizable.

Recent genetic analyses have revealed low differentiation between northern and southern populations in Florida, yet unfortunately lower genetic diversity among south Florida populations due to habitat fragmentation.

The Bahamas represent an isolated population of this species that may be at risk from human activity or other forms of disturbance such as hurricanes.

Conservation efforts will help ensure the protection of these birds for generations to come.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Sittidae
Genus Sitta
Species S. pusilla

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33. Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated hummingbird

The ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) is a species of hummingbird that has an impressive migration pattern, spending the winter in Central America, Mexico, and Florida before flying to Canada and other parts of Eastern North America for the breeding season.

It’s by far the most common type seen east of the Mississippi River in North America.

Formally described by Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus in 1758, this tiny bird has bright metallic green upperparts with white underparts, a small black bill, and a red throat patch which gives it its name; they measure around 3 inches long on average.

They feed primarily on nectar from flowers but also eat insects such as flies or mosquitoes for extra protein during their migrations or when raising young chicks.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Apodiformes
Family Trochilidae
Genus Archilochus
Species A. colubris

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34. Red-Headed Woodpecker

Red-headed woodpecker

The red-headed woodpecker is a mid-sized bird found in temperate North America. It has striking plumage, with its head and neck being bright red while the rest of its body is primarily black and white.

Its wings are rounder than other similar species, allowing it to maneuver through tight spaces easily when searching for food or shelter.

The breeding habitat of this bird consists mainly of open fields across Canada and the east-central United States.

Despite facing threats such as deforestation, urbanization, predation from larger birds, and collisions with windows or cars due to their inquisitive nature.

These birds remain listed on IUCN’s Red List as least concern thanks largely in part to conservation efforts by local governments and organizations dedicated to protecting wildlife habitats.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Piciformes
Family Picidae
Genus Melanerpes
Species M. erythrocephalus

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35. Ruby-Crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned kinglet

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet is a small passerine bird native to North America. It has olive-green plumage, white wing bars, and an eye-ring as well as a distinctive red crown patch on the males.

Juveniles look similar to adults with no distinguishing features other than size.

They are usually found in coniferous forests or woodlands where they spend much of their time searching for insects among foliage and branches while constantly flitting from place to place.

These birds have incredible energy levels that allow them to travel long distances during migration season without getting exhausted too quickly, making them one of nature’s most resilient species.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Regulidae
Genus Corthylio Cabanis, 1853
Species C. calendula

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36. Indigo Bunting

Indigo bunting

The Indigo Bunting is a small bird in the cardinal family, found throughout North and South America.

It has an unmistakable bright blue plumage that stands out against its natural habitat of farmland, brush areas, and open woodland.

During breeding season it can be seen from southern Canada to northern Florida while during winter months it migrates south towards Central and Northern South America.

The Indigo Bunting prefers to migrate at night using the stars as navigation aids.

This species feeds on insects and seeds which they find near the ground or catch mid-flight with their agile wingspan.

An iconic sight for many farmers across both continents, these birds are a welcome addition to any backyard oasis or wildflower meadow.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Cardinalidae
Genus Passerina
Species P. cyanea

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37. Eastern Phoebe

Eastern phoebe

The Eastern Phoebe is a small passerine bird belonging to the genus Sayornis. It gets its name from Charles Lucien Bonaparte’s Muscicapa saya, and Ancient Greek ornis meaning “bird”.

The species’ alternative name ‘Phoebe’ comes from the Roman moon goddess Diana, but also has been said to imitate their call.

Measuring up to 16 cm in length with a wingspan of 25–30 cm, they have grayish brown upperparts and pale underparts.

They are found near streams, woodlands, and open fields where they hunt for insects such as flies, bees wasps, etc., often catching them midair or by sallying out from perches like branches or fences.

These birds make shallow cup nests made of grasses lined with mud which are built on cliffs ledges walls buildings bridges trees etc.

All in all this beautiful little bird is an interesting addition wherever you find it.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Tyrannidae
Genus Sayornis
Species S. phoebe

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38. Purple Finch

Purple finch

The Purple Finch is a species of finch from North America, belonging to the Fringillidae family.

It’s also known as an “American Rosefinch” due to its resemblance in color and size to some European rosefinches.

Their plumage ranges from pinkish-purple on their heads and wings, with a light brown underside.

They are small birds that measure about 5-6 inches long with short thin beaks for eating seeds and insects.

In addition, they have thick round bodies which help them stay warm during cold winters in the northern parts of their range.

The Purple Finch has adapted well over time making it easier for them to survive even though there are increasing threats posed by humans such as deforestation or habitat destruction caused by development projects near their habitats.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Fringillidae
Subfamily Carduelinae
Genus Haemorhous
Species H. purpureus

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39. Cooper’s Hawk

Cooper s hawk

Cooper’s Hawk is a medium-sized bird of prey native to North America. It belongs to the Accipiter genus, which is known for its agility and small size compared to other hawks.

They usually inhabit wooded areas, making them well-adapted hunters in dense environments.

Cooper’s Hawks have rounded wings with short tails that help them maneuver quickly through trees when chasing after prey such as small rodents or birds.

These raptors also possess powerful feet equipped with sharp talons used for catching food items on the ground and even out of midair.

The adult plumage has barred upperparts, ranging from greyish brown on lighter individuals up to dark chestnut colors found in darker specimens; they also display rusty underparts marked by thin white streaking down either side of their chests and bellies.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Accipitriformes
Family Accipitridae
Genus Accipiter
Species A. cooperii

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40. Hooded Warbler

Hooded warbler

The Hooded Warbler is a species of New World warblers that breed in eastern North America and migrate to Central America and the West Indies for winter.

It has distinctive yellow, hood-like markings on its head which distinguish it from other similar-looking birds.

Recent genetic research suggests that this bird was originally classified as Wilsonia citrina, making it one of the oldest known species discovered by scientists today.

The Hooded Warbler can be found near moist woodlands where they feed mainly on insects such as caterpillars and grasshoppers.

They have also been observed eating fruits including wild cherries during migration periods when food sources are scarce.

This unique little bird plays an important role in maintaining healthy ecosystems throughout their range; however, climate change may pose serious threats to their survival if not addressed soon enough.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Parulidae
Genus Setophaga
Species S. citrina

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41. Spotted Sandpiper

Spotted sandpiper

The Spotted sandpiper (Actitis macularius) is a small shorebird that can be found across North America and parts of South America.

It has an appealing spotted plumage, predominately brown with white spots on the wings, tail feathers, head, and neck.

The Common Sandpiper (A. hypoleucos) is its sister species which takes over geographically when the other moves away; they have been known to hybridize as well when strays settle down among breeders.

This bird was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1766 in his twelfth edition of Systema Naturae as a migratory summer visitor to Europe but it now also occupies many habitats like beaches, riversides, and even grasslands during migration periods or for breeding season itself.

Its diet consists mainly of insects such as air-borne flies plus molluscs from shallow water areas – this makes them unique amongst waders.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Charadriiformes
Family Scolopacidae
Genus Actitis
Species A. macularius

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42. House Wren

House wren

The House Wren is a small bird of the Wren family found from Canada to South America. It’s quite common in suburban areas and is one of the most widely distributed native birds in North and South America.

Its taxonomy can be complicated, with some subspecies groups considered separate species.

The House Wren has a brown back, grey head, white eyebrow stripes, light chestnut belly, and buffy flanks.

They often inhabit old or abandoned buildings as well as shrublands near fields or open woods for nesting sites.

During breeding season they are highly territorial so make sure you create an inviting environment if you wish to invite them into your yard.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Troglodytidae
Genus Troglodytes
Species T. aedon

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43. White-Eyed Vireo

The White-eyed vireo is a small songbird in the family Vireonidae, native to parts of the eastern United States from New England to northern Missouri, Texas, and Florida.

It also occurs in Mexico, Central America, Cuba, and Caribbean islands such as the Bahamas.

These birds are migratory on their North American range but become resident further south towards the Gulf Coast.

They inhabit wooded areas with thick shrubbery or foliage which offer plenty of insects for them to feed upon.

Their call consists of sharp ‘chick’ notes while they sing a sweet melodious warble during the breeding season making them popular among birdwatchers all over the world.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Vireonidae
Genus Vireo
Species V. griseus

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44. Pine Siskin

Pine siskin

The Pine Siskin is a small bird from the finch family, primarily found in North America. It has an irregular migratory range and was first described by American ornithologist Alexander Wilson in 1810.

The species gets its name pinus, which means “pine tree” in Latin, due to its frequent presence near coniferous trees.

Pine siskins are known for their yellow wing bars and streaked chests as well as their perky mannerisms when perched on branches or flying around looking for food during colder months.

They feed mostly on seeds of weeds, grasses, and other plants but can also be seen consuming insects at times during the summertime nesting season.

Its loud calls often alert nearby birds of potential danger while they nest high up among pine tree limbs where predators cannot reach them easily.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Fringillidae
Subfamily Carduelinae
Genus Spinus
Species S. pinus

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45. Evening Grosbeak

Evening grosbeak

The Evening Grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertina) is a beautiful passerine bird in the finch family Fringillidae native to North America.

It has an impressive wingspan of up to 20 inches and its plumage is mostly black, yellow, or grey with distinctive white patches on each side of its head.

Its diet consists mainly of seeds and other plant matter as well as small insects, fruit, and berries when available.

The male’s song is loud and melodic which can be heard from some distance away during breeding season making it a popular species for avid backyard birders.

The Evening Grosbeak typically nests high in coniferous trees where they build cup-shaped structures lined with feathers or grass that protect predators.

Overall this species makes an excellent addition to any backyard aviary.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Fringillidae
Subfamily Carduelinae
Genus Hesperiphona
Species H. vespertina

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46. Orange-Crowned Warbler

The Orange-crowned Warbler is a small songbird from the New World warbler family. It was formally described in 1822 by Thomas Say, who gave it its scientific name Sylvia celatus – Latin for ‘cloaked’.

This species has an olive-green back and wings with yellowish underparts. The males have bright orange crowns during breeding season, which gives this bird its namesake.

They can be found mainly in North America but they also migrate to Central America during winter months.

Their diet consists of insects such as butterflies, moths, grasshoppers, and beetles; they may also consume fruits occasionally when available.

These birds are relatively quiet except for their mating calls which include whistles or buzzing sounds that last a few seconds long each time.

The Orange-crowned Warbler is one of the most widespread passerines today due to their hardiness and adaptability; however, there remains the threat of habitat destruction that could affect many populations negatively if not addressed soon enough.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Parulidae
Genus Leiothlypis
Species L. celata

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47. Common Yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

The Common Yellowthroat is a small, New World Warbler found throughout North America. It has distinctive yellow and black plumage that earned it the nickname “Yellow Bandit” in the Midwest United States.

This species is highly adaptable and can be found inhabiting wetlands, grasslands, shrubland habitats, as well as suburban areas.

The genus of this bird’s scientific name translates to mean ‘ground’ and ‘small bird’, which are fitting characteristics for such an elusive yet common little creature.

Its diet consists predominantly of insects but may also include other invertebrates like spiders or worms.

Overall the Common Yellowthroat makes an excellent addition to any backyard with its cheerful song.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Parulidae
Genus Geothlypis
Species G. trichas

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48. Summer Tanager

The Summer Tanager is a stunningly beautiful member of the cardinal family. Native to North and South America, this medium-sized songbird features striking red plumage on its back with yellow underparts.

It has a pointed black bill and long tail feathers that can be seen fluttering through the air when it flies.

The species’ vocalizations are quite similar to those of other members of its genus as well, which often include short whistles and chirps in addition to longer songs made up of various phrases or syllables.

With their vibrant colors and melodic voices, these birds make an eye-catching sight any time they appear.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Cardinalidae
Genus Piranga
Species P. rubra

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49. American Redstart

The American Redstart is a beautiful New World Warbler, first documented by Carl Linnaeus in 1758.

It has an elegant black and orange plumage that sets it apart from other birds.

The genus name Setophaga comes from the Ancient Greek words ‘sēs’ meaning moth and ‘phagos’, which means eating – referencing its insect-eating habits.

Its song is one of joy, with short repeating phrases making up their melodic tune.

They are mostly found hopping around trees on their long legs during breeding season but migrate to Central America for winter months when food sources become scarce in North America.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Passeriformes
Family Parulidae
Genus Setophaga
Species S. ruticilla

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50. Mississippi Kite

The Mississippi kite is a small raptor belonging to the family Accipitridae. It has long, narrow wings that give it an elegant flight style, often appearing to float in the air.

This bird of prey can be found circling its habitat and is also known for being highly social with other birds of its kind – sometimes several can be seen together at once.

First named by Scottish ornithologist Alexander Wilson in 1811, this species typically inhabits open grasslands or savanna areas across parts of North America.

The Mississippi kite feeds mainly on insects but will occasionally hunt small rodents as well.

These beautiful creatures have reddish-brown plumage on their backs and pale grey heads and breasts which make them quite distinguishable from most other avian species.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Accipitriformes
Family Accipitridae
Genus Ictinia
Species I. mississippiensis

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51. Northern Flicker

Northern flicker

The Northern flicker is a woodpecker species found in North America, Central America, Cuba, and the Cayman Islands. This medium-sized bird is known for its unique migration behavior.

Over 100 common names are used to refer to the Northern Flicker, one of them being “yellowhammer”. It is a beautiful bird with distinctive markings and colorful plumage.

The Northern flicker is an important species in its ecosystem and plays a key role in maintaining a healthy balance in the environment.

Despite being a woodpecker, the Northern Flicker has a diverse diet that includes insects, fruits, and seeds.

It is fascinating to observe this bird as it pecks at trees in search of food, communicates with its unique vocalizations, and performs its incredible aerial displays.

The Northern flicker is truly a remarkable bird species that is worthy of our admiration and protection.

Scientific classification:

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Aves
Order Piciformes
Family Picidae
Genus Colaptes
Species C. auratus

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Conclusion

Mississippi truly lives up to its reputation as a birdwatcher’s paradise, offering a remarkable array of 51 amazing bird species for enthusiasts to observe and appreciate.

From the vibrant Painted Bunting to the elegant Swallow-tailed Kite, this state’s diverse landscapes provide abundant opportunities for birdwatching.

The diverse ecosystems, including wetlands, forests, and coastal areas, make Mississippi a haven for both resident and migratory birds.

With the right guidance and a keen eye, visitors can enjoy the beauty of these avian wonders in their natural habitats.

Preserving these environments is crucial to ensuring the continued presence of these incredible birds in Mississippi’s skies.

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