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44 Yellow Birds You’ll Find In Minnesota

Minnesota is a fantastic place if you are a bird enthusiast, with over 400 species found within the state. Among them, the presence of yellow birds in Minnesota adds a special charm to the bird life here.

These yellow birds are the ones that add sunshine to the surroundings with their bright and colorful appearance. These birds are quite diverse and come in varied sizes and shapes, from the great American Goldfinch to the tiny and cute Yellow Warbler.

You can spot these yellow birds in Minnesota in different habitats ranging from prairies to forests, wetlands, and riversides. Let’s explore these beautiful birds found in Minnesota in more detail.

1. American Robin

American robin

The American robin is a migratory bird, belonging to the true thrush genus and Turdidae family.

It was named after its European counterpart due to the similar reddish-orange breast they both possess; however, they are not related closely.

This species can be seen through most of North America during winter months, as well as in parts of Mexico and Central America where it also breeds.

They have plump bodies with gray upperparts and white underparts that vary from yellow on their throats down to orange toward their bellies.

Robins feed on fruits such as berries or insects like worms which makes them an important part of ecosystems by helping disperse seeds naturally throughout these areas.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTurdidae
GenusTurdus
SpeciesT. migratorius

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2. American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

The American goldfinch is a small North American bird in the finch family. Males are vibrant yellow with black wings and tail, while females are duller in colouration.

It migrates from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during breeding season, south of Canada–United States border to Mexico for its wintering grounds.

The only finch which undergoes complete molt every year, it displays sexual dichromatism where males have brighter colours than their female counterparts.

They feed mainly on seeds but also eat insects such as aphids and caterpillars when raising youngs; they often occur near thistles or other plants that produce viable seed heads.

Their call consists of an array of chirps and trills making them quite conspicuous.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyFringillidae
SubfamilyCarduelinae
GenusSpinus
SpeciesS. tristis

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3. Western Meadowlark

Western meadowlark

The western meadowlark is a medium-sized icterid bird native to North America. It has a distinct yellow breast with black and white patches, making it easy to spot in open grasslands.

Its diet consists of mostly bugs but also includes seeds and berries. The western meadowlark’s call is unique – its sound described as flute-like or watery, differentiating it from the similar eastern meadowlark species.

When nesting season arrives, they build their nests on the ground near shrubs or low trees in areas like fields and pastures.

This beautiful songbird adds life to our open lands with its melodious tunes.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusSturnella
SpeciesS. neglecta

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4. Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore oriole

The Baltimore Oriole is a small, blackbird-like bird found in eastern North America. It’s named for the resemblance of its male colors to those on Lord Baltimore’s coat-of-arms from 17th century.

These birds migrate and breed during springtime and are quite common in their habitats.

Studies have shown that this species interbreeds with western Bullock’s orioles, leading both to be classified as a single species – Icterus galbula.

The males typically have orange feathers along the chest, back, wings and tail while females display tan or yellowish shades instead of bright orange ones like males do.

Both sexes share white wing bars and dark brown eyes which makes them easily distinguishable among other birds.

They can often be seen flitting around trees feeding off nectar buds or insects such as grasshoppers & caterpillars they catch while flying around.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusIcterus
SpeciesI. galbula

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5. New World Warblers

New World warblers

New World warblers are an incredibly diverse family of small birds found only in the Americas. They range in size from tiny hummingbirds to large thrushes, and come in a variety of vibrant colors.

All have thin bills made for eating insects which form their main diet. Most species live predominantly arboreal lives, meaning they spend most of their time among trees or bushes searching for food.

However some members such as ovenbirds and waterthrushes prefer more terrestrial habitats like forest floors where they can scavenge for bugs on the ground instead.

Warblers provide a great source of entertainment with their beautiful songs often filling up woodlands during mornings and evenings throughout springtime.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
SuperfamilyEmberizoidea
FamilyParulidae Wetmore et al., 1947

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6. Common Starling

Common starling

The Common Starling is a medium-sized passerine bird that belongs to the starling family. It has glossy black plumage with a metallic sheen, and in certain times of year it can be speckled with white.

The bill and legs are typically pink or black depending on the season, while its length measures about 8 inches long.

Its diet consists mainly of insects but also includes small fruits and seeds as well as some human food waste.

They live in large flocks which provides protection against predators, although they can become quite aggressive when defending their nesting sites during breeding seasons.

Overall, this species is highly adaptable and widely distributed across many parts of Europe making them one of the most successful birds in the region today.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilySturnidae
GenusSturnus
SpeciesS. vulgaris

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7. Yellow-Rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped warbler

The Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) is a migratory bird species that can be found throughout North America.

It has an extensive range, from the Pacific and Atlantic coats of the US to Canada and Central America, with a concentration in northern areas during breeding season.

These birds migrate southwards for wintering grounds where they find plentiful food sources such as insects and berries.

They are easily identified by their yellow patches on either side of their tails, along with white underparts, gray back feathers and two distinct crown stripes.

One black or greyish-brown above the eyes extending towards its neck banded in yellow or light brown colouration.

Furthermore, these warblers have strong legs which allow them to cling onto branches while hunting for prey making them adept at maneuvering through tree cover quickly.

All together this makes the Yellow-rumped Warbler an attractive backyard visitor year round.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. coronata

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8. Lesser Goldfinch

Lesser goldfinch

The Lesser Goldfinch is a tiny species of bird found in the Americas. It belongs to the same clade as American goldfinches and Lawrence’s goldfinches, which can be identified by their males having black or rarely green foreheads.

The face appears red or yellow on these birds unlike other species in its genus Spinus sensu stricto.

They are small songbirds with short bills, brown wings and tails with white edges, grey-brown backs and olive heads.

These birds inhabit open woodlands and fields where they feed mainly on seeds from weeds such as thistle, pigweed and ragweed but also consume insects at times during breeding season for additional nutrition.

In addition to being an important part of North America’s avian ecology, these birds have been popularized through recent artwork depicting them in various poses among flowers.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyFringillidae
SubfamilyCarduelinae
GenusSpinus
SpeciesS. psaltria

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9. Canada Warbler

Canada warbler

The Canada warbler is a small songbird of the Parulidae family, native to North America. It has olive-green upper parts with yellow underparts and white wing bars, making it easily identifiable.

During summer months they are found in Canada and northeastern United States while during winter their range extends to northern South America.

Mathurin Jacques Brisson was the first to describe this species in 1760 after he collected a specimen from Canada; which resulted in its French name Le gobe-mouche du Canada (Canada’s flycatcher).

Its diet consists mainly of insects such as beetles and mosquitoes, but also includes berries occassionally.

With an estimated population of 5 million individuals they remain common across much of their range although numbers have been declining due to habitat loss caused by human development activities like logging or agricultural expansion.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusCardellina
SpeciesC. canadensis

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10. Cape May Warbler

Cape May warbler

The Cape May Warbler is a species of New World warbler that breeds in northern North America, ranging from southern Canada to the Great Lakes region and New England.

During wintertime it migrates to the West Indies. This bird is an uncommon vagrant to western Europe with two records so far in Britain as of 2013.

It gets its name from being first discovered near Cape May, New Jersey back in 1811 by Alexander Wilson who noted its yellow breast plumage and black streaking on his specimen’s sides.

The males are more brightly colored than females but both sexes have white eye rings which help distinguish them among other warblers during migration season.

They mainly feed on insects and can often be seen foraging at high levels up amongst trees or shrubs where they tend their nests containing 3-5 eggs each breeding season between April – June.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. tigrina

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11. Eastern Meadowlark

Eastern meadowlark

The Eastern meadowlark is a medium-sized blackbird, found from eastern North America to northern South America.

It used to be considered the same species as the Western meadowlark but has since been separated into its own distinct species.

The bird is mainly brown with yellow underparts and an orange patch on its throat; it also has white wing bars which can be seen in flight.

Its song consists of a series of musical whistles followed by gurgling notes at the end, earning them their nickname “rainmaker” birds because they are believed to bring rain if heard singing during dry weather.

These beautiful birds feed mostly on insects, seeds and other plant material while nesting amongst grasses or low shrubs near open fields where there’s plenty of food available for them.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusSturnella
SpeciesS. magna

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12. Pine Warbler

Pine warbler

The Pine Warbler is a small bird from the New World warbler family, with an olive-brown upperparts and white belly.

Its distinguishing features include two white wing bars, dark legs, thin pointed bills and yellowish ‘spectacles’ around its eyes.

Adult males have bright yellow throats and breasts on top of their olive upperparts; females and immatures are less vibrant in colour but retain similar characteristics.

These birds can be found near pine forests throughout North America during summer months before migrating to warmer climates for winter.

They feed mainly on insects such as caterpillars, spiders and flies while also consuming fruits like blueberries when food becomes scarce in colder times of year.

All in all, these tiny songbirds provide us with much beauty through their unique plumage patterns whilst serving important roles within their ecosystems.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. pinus

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13. Scarlet Tanager

Scarlet tanager

The Scarlet Tanager is a beautiful medium-sized bird found in parts of North and South America. It belongs to the Cardinal family, and has striking red plumage with black wings and tail feathers.

Its song is similar to other cardinals yet also unique in its own way – it’s recognizable by its high whistles that become lower towards the end.

The species feeds mainly on insects as well as berries from trees or shrubs during breeding season, when they may form loose flocks over open woodlands foraging for food.

They are highly territorial birds during nesting season which happens between April and June each year; both males and females fiercely defend their nests against intruders such as cats or squirrels.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCardinalidae
GenusPiranga
SpeciesP. olivacea

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14. Hooded Warbler

Hooded warbler

The Hooded Warbler is a species of New World warblers that breed in eastern North America and migrate to Central America and the West Indies for winter.

It has distinctive yellow, hood-like markings on its head which distinguish it from other similar looking birds.

Recent genetic research suggests that this bird was originally classified as Wilsonia citrina, making it one of the oldest known species discovered by scientists today.

The Hooded Warbler can be found near moist woodlands where they feed mainly on insects such as caterpillars and grasshoppers.

They have also been observed eating fruits including wild cherries during migration periods when food sources are scarce.

This unique little bird plays an important role in maintaining healthy ecosystems throughout their range; however climate change may pose serious threats to their survival if not addressed soon enough.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. citrina

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15. Evening Grosbeak

Evening grosbeak

The Evening Grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertina) is a beautiful passerine bird in the finch family Fringillidae native to North America.

It has an impressive wingspan of up to 20 inches and its plumage is mostly black, yellow or grey with distinctive white patches on each side of its head.

Its diet consists mainly of seeds and other plant matter as well as small insects, fruit and berries when available.

The male’s song is loud and melodic which can be heard from some distance away during breeding season making it a popular species for avid backyard birders.

The Evening Grosbeak typically nests high in coniferous trees where they build cup-shaped structures lined with feathers or grass that provide protection against predators.

Overall this species makes an excellent addition to any backyard aviary.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyFringillidae
SubfamilyCarduelinae
GenusHesperiphona
SpeciesH. vespertina

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16. Great Crested Flycatcher

Great Crested Flycatcher

The Great crested flycatcher is a large insect-eating bird belonging to the tyrant flycatcher family.

It has an extensive range across North America, inhabiting most of the eastern and midwestern parts of the continent. They are usually found in treetops but rarely come down to ground level.

Adults measure around 7 inches long with wingspans up to 12 inches wide and they have grayish brown heads with yellow throats and upper breasts while their backs tend to be olive green or grey mixed with black spots on some species.

Their tails are broad, reaching lengths up 8 inches long, often being cocked when perched as they search for insects below them in trees or shrubs.

The males also possess a crest which adds even more splash of colour during mating season.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTyrannidae
GenusMyiarchus
SpeciesM. crinitus

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17. Yellow-Bellied Flycatcher

Yellow-bellied flycatcher

The Yellow-bellied Flycatcher is a small bird of the tyrant flycatcher family. It has greenish upperparts and yellowish underparts, with a dusky wash on its chest.

Its distinctive feature is the white or yellow eye ring that lacks any teardrop projection – setting it apart from other similar species in its family.

This insectivorous bird can be found in open habitats such as forest edges and woodland clearings across much of North America during summer months, when they migrate south to warmer areas for wintertime nesting.

They feed mainly on insects caught by sallying out after them from an exposed perch, but also take fruit occasionally at times of year when there are fewer flying insect prey available to eat.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTyrannidae
GenusEmpidonax
SpeciesE. flaviventris

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18. Western Kingbird

Western kingbird

The Western kingbird is a large tyrant flycatcher native to western North America. It has striking plumage, with gray and yellow feathers tinged with crimson during courtship or when defending territory from intruders.

As is characteristic of its kind, the Western Kingbird exhibits highly territorial behavior towards other birds in its area.

They are found as far south as Mexico, inhabiting open habitats near bodies of water such as rivers and lakes.

While their primary diet consists of insects like bees and flies that they catch mid-flight, it also includes fruit for variety during winter months.

The species have recently seen an increase in population due to conservation efforts which aim to protect these beautiful creatures.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyTyrannidae
GenusTyrannus
SpeciesT. verticalis

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19. Double-Crested Cormorant

Double-crested cormorant

The double-crested cormorant is a majestic bird with an impressive wingspan, found across North America from the Aleutian Islands all the way down to Mexico.

Its black plumage stands out against its bright orange-yellow facial skin and some extended patches of white feathers on each side of its throat.

It measures between 28 – 35 inches in length and has webbed feet that enable it to swim gracefully through rivers and lakes, as well as coastal areas.

These birds are known for their voracious appetite for fish, sometimes diving over 100 ft deep into water looking for food.

Despite this reputation they also feed on crustaceans, amphibians and insects when available.

Cormorants have been part of many cultures throughout history due to their remarkable ability to fly long distances making them valued messengers or companions during fishing expeditions at sea.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderSuliformes
FamilyPhalacrocoracidae
GenusNannopterum
SpeciesN. auritum

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20. Dickcissel

Dickcissel

The Dickcissel is a small migratory bird belonging to the Cardinalidae family. It breeds in grasslands of the Midwestern US, and winters in Central America, northern Colombia and Venezuela.

Being the only member of its genus Spiza, it stands out from other birds with its distinctive song that sounds like “dick-sis-sel”.

With a light brown body and black streaks on its wings as well as chestnut colored shoulders and crowns, these birds are quite attractive to watch.

They also have short bills which they use while foraging through tall prairie vegetation or searching around fence posts for insects.

Although not endangered yet, their population has declined due to loss of habitat caused by human development so conservation efforts should be taken up soon.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCardinalidae
GenusSpiza Bonaparte, 1824
SpeciesS. americana

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21. Golden-Crowned Kinglet

Golden-crowned kinglet

The Golden-crowned Kinglet is a small songbird native to North America. It has an olive-gray top and white underparts, with thin bills and short tails.

The most distinguishing feature of this bird is its yellow crown, surrounded by a black patch that extends through the eyes.

Males have an additional orange patch in the middle of their yellow crowns. They are active birds, often seen flitting from branch to branch as they search for insects or other food sources in trees or shrubs.

During winter months when there’s less insect prey available, Golden-crowned Kinglets will join mixed species flocks searching for berries on bushes and trees throughout forests across North America.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyRegulidae
GenusRegulus
SpeciesR. satrapa

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22. Painted Bunting

Painted bunting

The Painted Bunting is an eye-catching bird from the Cardinal family, native to North America. It was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his eighteenth-century Systema Naturae.

The males of this species are particularly striking; they have brightly coloured plumage which only appears after their second year of life and can be distinguished from female birds through close inspection.

These colourful songbirds are a delight for any avid birder, with their vibrant hues bringing joy to nature lovers everywhere.

They often inhabit woodland areas where there is plenty of seed and insects available for them to feed on – as well as some shrubbery so that they can hide away safely when needed.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCardinalidae
GenusPasserina
SpeciesP. ciris

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23. Orange-Crowned Warbler

Orange-Crowned Warbler

The Orange-crowned Warbler is a small songbird from the New World warbler family. It was formally described in 1822 by Thomas Say, who gave it its scientific name Sylvia celatus – Latin for ‘cloaked’.

This species has an olive green back and wings with yellowish underparts. The males have bright orange crowns during breeding season, which give this bird its namesake.

They can be found mainly in North America but they also migrate to Central America during winter months.

Their diet consists of insects such as butterflies, moths, grasshoppers and beetles; they may also consume fruits occasionally when available.

These birds are relatively quiet except for their mating calls which include whistles or buzzing sounds that last a few seconds long each time.

The Orange-crowned Warbler is one of the most wide spread passerines today due to their hardiness and adaptability; however there remains threat of habitat destruction that could affect many populations negatively if not addressed soon enough.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusLeiothlypis
SpeciesL. celata

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24. American Yellow Warbler

American yellow warbler

The American Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) is a species of New World warbler found across North America, the Caribbean and into northern South America.

Its genus name Setophaga comes from Ancient Greek words meaning “moth” and “eating”, while its specific name Petechia originates from Italian for small red spots.

This bird has striking yellow plumage with reddish-brown streaks on their chest that can be seen during mating season when they are most colourful.

They live in open woodlands near wetlands or bodies of water where they can find food such as insects like spiders, beetles and caterpillars which make up much of their diet.

The male will sing to attract a mate during breeding season before setting up home in twig nests built by both sexes together high in trees or shrubs.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. petechia

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25. Yellow-Headed Blackbird

Yellow-headed blackbird

The yellow-headed blackbird is a medium-sized bird with striking features – its head and neck are bright yellow, while the rest of its body is black.

It has large eyes, a pointed bill and long wings that help it to soar through the air.

The species gets its name from Greek words meaning ‘yellow’ (xanthous) and ‘head’ (cephalus).

This species can be found in wetlands across North America during summer months where they feed on insects and other invertebrates such as snails, earthworms, spiders and crustaceans.

During winter months they migrate southward for food or when temperatures drop too low for their comfort.

They also form flocks which makes them more visible than solitary birds like hawks or owls. Yellow-headed Blackbirds make beautiful sounds that echo around wetland areas; these melodic calls bring joy to many nature lovers.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusXanthocephalus Bonaparte, 1850
SpeciesX. xanthocephalus

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26. Orchard Oriole

Orchard oriole

The Orchard Oriole is a small species of icterid bird, with the subspecies I. s. fuertesi sometimes considered its own separate species known as the Ochre or Fuertes’ Oriole.

The adult male of the nominate subspecies has chestnut upperparts and black wings and tail, while females are more yellowish-green in coloration on their back and wings.

Its bill is pointed, black in color with some blue-gray at the base of its lower mandible.

This beautiful bird can also be found across North America during migration season; they inhabit woodlands near streams or rivers to breed before migrating south for winter months.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusIcterus
SpeciesI. spurius

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27. Common Yellowthroat

Common yellowthroat

The Common Yellowthroat is a small, New World Warbler found throughout North America. It has distinctive yellow and black plumage that earned it the nickname “Yellow Bandit” in the Midwest United States.

This species is highly adaptable and can be found inhabiting wetlands, grasslands, shrub-land habitats, as well as suburban areas.

The genus of this bird’s scientific name translates to mean ‘ground’ and ‘small bird’, which are fitting characteristics for such an elusive yet common little creature.

Its diet consists predominantly of insects but may also include other invertebrates like spiders or worms.

Overall the Common Yellowthroat makes an excellent addition to any backyard with its cheerful song.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusGeothlypis
SpeciesG. trichas

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28. Wilson’s Warbler

Wilson's Warbler

Wilson’s warbler is a small, brightly coloured bird found across North America. It has greenish upperparts and yellow underparts, with rounded wings and a long tail.

The male has an easily identifiable black crown patch which may or may not be present in the female depending on the subspecies.

They breed from Canada down to central parts of Mexico and then winter south through much of Central America.

These birds are usually seen flitting around low vegetation as they search for insects to eat – their main food source.

Their cheerful song can often be heard during spring migration when they travel back up north to breed again after spending winter further south.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusCardellina
SpeciesC. pusilla

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29. Yellow-Throated Vireo

Yellow-throated vireo

The Yellow-throated Vireo is a small songbird found in North America. It has an olive head and upperparts with a yellow throat and white belly, along with dark wings and tail feathers.

The vireo’s scientific name comes from the Latin words “flavus” meaning yellow, and “frons” meaning forehead – alluding to its distinctive colouring.

These birds feed mainly on insects which they catch by hovering over vegetation or flying out to seize them midair.

During breeding season males are known for their loud singing as they defend their territories against rival suitors.

Nonbreeding individuals may congregate in large flocks while migrating southward during autumn months, making quite a spectacle of themselves.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyVireonidae
GenusVireo
SpeciesV. flavifrons

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30. Black-Throated Green Warbler

Black-throated green warbler

The Black-throated Green Warbler is a beautiful and dainty songbird in the New World warbler family.

It has an olive green crown, yellow face with dark markings, white wing bars and pale underparts streaked with black on the sides.

Adult males have a striking black throat and upper breast while females show paler coloration on their throats but retain some black patterning across their chest area.

They are quite small birds measuring around 14 cm in length from bill to tail tip that make them easy to miss if they aren’t singing.

Their diet consists mainly of insects which they catch by flitting through trees or shrubs as well as foraging among foliage making this species great help in controlling bug populations.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. virens

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31. Northern Parula

Northern Parula

The Northern Parula is a small, migratory warbler native to North America. It measures between 4.3 and 4.9 inches in length and has a wingspan of 6.3-7.1 inches wide.

Its plumage consists mainly of yellowish green upper parts with an orange patch on its chest as well as blue crowns for males during the breeding season.

Females have duller colors than their male counterparts overall but are still quite striking from afar.

This species breeds primarily in eastern Canada down through Florida, though some northern populations may migrate southward come wintertime while others stick around year round depending on the weather conditions they face each year – truly amazing adaptability set them apart from other birds in this region.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. americana

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32. Summer Tanager

Summer tanager

The Summer Tanager is a stunningly beautiful member of the cardinal family. Native to North and South America, this medium-sized songbird features striking red plumage on its back with yellow underparts.

It has a pointed black bill and long tail feathers that can be seen fluttering through the air when it flies.

The species’ vocalizations are quite similar to those of other members of its genus as well, which often include short whistles and chirps in addition to longer songs made up of various phrases or syllables.

With their vibrant colors and melodic voices, these birds make an eye-catching sight any time they appear.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCardinalidae
GenusPiranga
SpeciesP. rubra

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33. Nashville Warbler

Nashville warbler

The Nashville Warbler is a small bird found in North and Central America. It has gray head, green back and yellowish-white underparts.

During breeding season it can be seen in parts of the northern and western United States, southern Canada as well as Mexico; while during winter it migrates to places like California, Texas or further south into Central America.

Its diet consists mainly of insects which they find by foraging on trees or shrubs near open woodlands with dense vegetation.

They are fairly active birds that move around often when searching for food, making them easy to spot if you know where to look.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusLeiothlypis
SpeciesL. ruficapilla

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34. Palm Warbler

Palm warbler

The palm warbler is a small songbird found in the New World, belonging to the warbler family.

It has two distinct subspecies that differ mainly in their plumage – eastern palm warblers have yellower underparts and bolder rufous streaks on their breast and flanks than western ones.

These birds are light olive above with whitish bellies and yellow throats.

They also have distinctive white-tipped tail feathers which they often flick while foraging or singing during breeding season, when males establish territories through song duels.

The diet of these birds consists mostly of insects such as beetles, moths, ants and caterpillars collected from trees or ground vegetation like grasses or sedges.

Palm Warblers migrate long distances between its wintering grounds near Central America to northeastern North American states where it breeds each summer before returning south again come fall.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. palmarum

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35. Horned Lark

Horned lark

The Horned Lark, known as the Shore Lark in Europe and North America, is a species of lark belonging to the family Alaudidae.

It can be found across the northern hemisphere and has been classified under its Latin name Eremophila alpestris which means “of high mountains”, referring to its prevalence in mountainous areas like the Alps.

This bird is distinguished by two black tufts or ‘horns’ on either side of its head. Its size varies from 11-13 cm long with brown upperparts and pale whitish underparts sporting darker streaks throughout them both.

With an adaptation for ground nesting, it builds nests out of grasses lined with feathers near open fields where food sources are abundant such as insects, grains and seeds giving this species great potential for survival even when conditions may become harsh during winter months.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyAlaudidae
GenusEremophila
SpeciesE. alpestris

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36. American Redstart

American redstart

The American Redstart is a beautiful New World Warbler, first documented by Carl Linnaeus in 1758.

It has an elegant black and orange plumage that sets it apart from other birds.

The genus name Setophaga comes from the Ancient Greek words ‘sēs’ meaning moth and ‘phagos’, which means eating – referencing its insect-eating habits.

Its song is one of joy, with short repeating phrases making up their melodic tune.

They are mostly found hopping around trees on their long legs during breeding season but migrate to Central America for winter months when food sources become scarce in North America.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. ruticilla

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37. Chestnut-Sided Warbler

Chestnut-sided warbler

The Chestnut-sided Warbler is a species of New World warbler native to eastern North America, the Canadian Prairies and Great Lakes region.

It gets its name from the chestnut colored feathers on either side of their body.

This genus (Setophaga) receive its scientific name due to their preference for moths as food, which is evident in all stages of life.

During breeding season, this small songbird can be heard singing high pitched songs from treetops or bushes.

They also have an interesting migration pattern; some individuals may migrate north during spring while others will travel south in fall depending on where they are located geographically.

Overall the Chestnut-Sided Warbler is a beautiful bird that deserves our attention and admiration.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. pensylvanica

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38. Kirtland’s Warbler

Kirtland s warbler

Kirtland’s warbler is a small songbird belonging to the New World warbler family and named after Jared Potter Kirtland. It was nearly extinct 50 years ago, but thanks to conservation efforts, its population has recovered.

This bird requires large areas of habitat with young jack pine stands for nesting, making it vulnerable when this type of habitat becomes scarce or disturbed.

The male birds have distinctive black streaks on their yellow chest and wings during breeding season from April through June in Michigan and Wisconsin.

Outside these months they migrate across Mexico, Caribbean islands and Florida before returning north again in springtime.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. kirtlandii

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39. Mourning Warbler

Mourning Warbler

The Mourning Warbler is a small songbird that belongs to the New World warbler family.

Originating in eastern and central North America, as well as some Central American countries, these birds migrate with the seasons and prefer dense second growth forests.

They are easily identified by their bright yellow-green plumage which has a distinct black mask extending from its beak down to its neck, giving it an almost melancholic look – hence the name ‘Mourning’ Warbler.

This species of bird loves singing and can often be heard chirping away during mating season or just mid flight.

With large eyes surrounded by white spectacles they also have strong legs allowing them to perch on trees for long periods at time while hunting insects among leaves and branches.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusGeothlypis
SpeciesG. philadelphia

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40. Scott’s Oriole

Scott s oriole

The Scott’s oriole is a medium-sized icterid found in the Southwestern United States, Mexico and Baja California Sur. Named by American soldier and naturalist John Charles Frémont for his friend Robert F.

Scott, this beautiful bird has bright yellow underparts with an orange back and black wings.

Its song consists of long series of whistles that are often likened to the sound of a flute or piccolo.

They feed mainly on insects but can also eat some fruits such as dates and figs from trees like mesquite, palo verde, live oak, sycamore and cottonwood.

This species is common south from Sacramento in California making it easy to spot if you’re lucky enough to be near its habitat.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyIcteridae
GenusIcterus
SpeciesI. parisorum

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41. Blackburnian Warbler

Blackburnian warbler

The Blackburnian warbler (Setophaga fusca) is a small New World songbird found primarily in eastern North America.

These birds breed from southern Canada, down to the Carolinas and as far west as the Canadian Prairies, Great Lakes region and New England.

They are migratory birds, spending their winters in Central America or South America; they have also been recorded rarely on western Europe.

The males of this species can be identified by their bright orange-red throat patches set against yellow head feathers.

Females may show some yellowish colouration but lack the distinct markings seen on male specimens.

This species feeds mainly on insects gleaned from tree branches during its breeding period; during migration it will eat fruit or nectar for sustenance instead.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. fusca

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42. Magnolia Warbler

Magnolia warbler

The Magnolia Warbler is a small and beautiful bird native to North America. It belongs to the wood warbler family of Parulidae and its name derives from type locality Fort Adams, Mississippi where it was first discovered by Alexander Wilson.

This species has an overall length ranging between 4 – 5 inches with wingspan measuring up to 6-7 inches long.

Its plumage consists of yellow chest which turns into olive green on top while its underside takes white hue and throat remains black in coloration along with two white wingbars present on either sides.

In terms of diet, they feed mainly on insects like caterpillars, moths etc., but also feeds upon fruits or seeds occasionally during winter season as well as migratory period too.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyParulidae
GenusSetophaga
SpeciesS. magnolia

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43. Northern Flicker

Northern flicker

The Northern flicker is a woodpecker species found in North America, Central America, Cuba, and the Cayman Islands. This medium-sized bird is known for its unique migration behavior.

Over 100 common names are used to refer to the Northern flicker, one of them being “yellowhammer”. It is a beautiful bird with distinctive markings and a colorful plumage.

The Northern flicker is an important species in its ecosystem and plays a key role in maintaining a healthy balance in the environment.

Despite being a woodpecker, the Northern flicker has a diverse diet that includes insects, fruits, and seeds.

It is fascinating to observe this bird as it pecks at trees in search of food, communicates with its unique vocalizations and performs its incredible aerial displays.

The Northern flicker is truly a remarkable bird species that is worthy of our admiration and protection.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPiciformes
FamilyPicidae
GenusColaptes
SpeciesC. auratus

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44. Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

The Cedar waxwing, also known as Bombycilla cedrorum, is a medium-sized bird found in North and Central America.

They have a mixture of brown, gray and yellow feathers on their body, and their wings have wax-like tips.

These birds prefer open wooded areas in Southern Canada for breeding, and during winter, they migrate to the Southern part of the United States, Central America, and the far.

The Cedar waxwing is a member of the waxwing family of birds or Bombycillidae family.

They are known for their distinctive crest on their head and a black mask-like area around their eyes.

These birds are social creatures and can often be seen in large flocks, sometimes even intermixing with other bird species.

Their diet consists mainly of fruit and insects, and they are important dispersers of fruit seeds.

The Cedar waxwing bird is a beautiful and fascinating creature to observe in the wild.

Scientific classification:

KingdomAnimalia
PhylumChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyBombycillidae
GenusBombycilla
SpeciesB. cedrorum

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